302d Fighter Squadron

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302d Fighter Squadron
Air Force Reserve Command.png
Australian International Airshow and Aerospace & Defence Exposition 2017 170302-F-ZB121-053.jpg
An F-22 Raptor from Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson at the Australian International Airshow and Aerospace & Defence Exposition in 2017
Active 1942–1945; 1956–present
Country  United States
Branch  United States Air Force
Role Fighter
Part of Air Force Reserve Command
Garrison/HQ Elmendorf Air Force Base
Motto(s) So That Others May Live (1956-1974) Anywhere, Anytime (1974-1987)
Engagements Mediterranean Theater of Operations[1]
Decorations Air Force Outstanding Unit Award[1]
Insignia
302d Fighter Squadron emblem (approved 25 May 2007[1] 302d Fighter Squadron.jpg
302d Air Rescue Squadron emblem 302 Air Rescue Sq.png


The 302d Fighter Squadron is part of the Air Force Reserve Command's 477th Fighter Group at Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska. It operates the Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor conducting an air superiority mission.

Mission[edit]

The 302d Fighter Squadron trains in the fighter missions of offensive counter air, defensive counter-air as well as strategic attack and interdiction.

History[edit]

World War II[edit]

The 302d was one of four African-American fighter squadrons to enter combat during World War II. It saw combat in the European Theater of Operations and Mediterranean Theater of Operations from 17 February 1944 – 20 February 1945.

Air force reserve[edit]

From 1956-1974, the squadron was assigned to the Air Force Reserve where it trained for and performed search and rescue in addition to aeromedical evacuation missions, mainly in the southwestern United States.

In 1974, its mission changed to training for a combat search and rescue role, while continuing to perform traditional humanitarian/non-combat search and rescue. The squadron's mission changed again in 1987 to a fighter role, training for counterair, interdiction, and close air support missions.

The unit that had been the 302d was reflagged as the 71st Special Operations Squadron and physically relocated to Davis-Monthan AFB, AZ. Concurrently, a new AFRES fighter squadron was established at Luke AFB, AZ and took over the 302d lineage as the 302d Tactical Fighter Squadron. With the transition of AFRES to Air Force Reserve Command (AFRC), the squadron deployed several times since late 1992 to Turkey to help enforce the no-fly zone over Iraq and to Italy to support UN air operations in the Balkans.[1]

In 2007, the squadron relocated from Luke AFB to Elmendorf AFB, AK and transitioned from the F-16 Fighting Falcon to the F-22 Raptor, which it operates as an Associate AFRC unit the active duty Air Force's 3rd Wing.

Lineage[edit]

302d Fighter Squadron (World War II)
  • Constituted as the 302d Fighter Squadron on 4 July 1942
Activated on 13 October 1942
Redesignated 302d Fighter Squadron, Single Engine on 21 August 1944
Inactivated on 6 Mar 1945
  • Consolidated with the 302d Special Operations Squadron as the 302d Special Operations Squadron on 19 September 1985[1]


302d Fighter Squadron
  • Constituted as the 302d Air Rescue Squadron on 1 August 1956
Activated in the reserve on 8 October 1956
Redesignated 302d Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron on 18 January 1966
Redesignated 302d Special Operations Squadron on 10 April 1974
Consolidated with the 302d Fighter Squadron on 19 September 1985
Redesignated 302 Tactical Fighter Squadron on 1 July 1987
Redesignated 302d Fighter Squadron on 1 February 1992[1]

Assignments[edit]

Stations[edit]

Aircraft[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Aircraft is General Dynamics F-16D Block 32 serial 87-381. This F-16 was assigned to the United States Air Force Thunderbirds between 1992 and 1999.

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i Robertson, Patsy (March 17, 2015). "Factsheet 302 Fighter Squadron (AFRC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Archived from the original on September 27, 2015. Retrieved August 14, 2017. 

Bibliography[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from the Air Force Historical Research Agency website http://www.afhra.af.mil/.