323 Brucia

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323 Brucia
323 Brucia.gif
Discovery[1]
Discovered by Max Wolf
Discovery date 22 December 1891
Designations
Named after
Catherine Wolfe Bruce
1923 JA; 1934 JC[1]
Mars-crossing asteroid[1]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 123.73 yr (45191 d)
Aphelion 3.0985 AU (463.53 Gm)
Perihelion 1.6659 AU (249.22 Gm)
2.3822 AU (356.37 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.30068
3.68 yr (1343.0 d)
18.9 km/s
359.397°
0° 16m 5.016s / day
Inclination 24.230°
97.403°
291.250°
Earth MOID 0.804221 AU (120.3097 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.61843 AU (391.712 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.361
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 35.82±1.7 km (IRAS)[1]
Mass 4.8×1016 kg (assumed)
Mean density
2? g/cm³
Equatorial surface gravity
0.010 m/s²
Equatorial escape velocity
0.019 km/s
9.463 h (0.3943 d)[1]
0.1765±0.018[1]
Temperature ~176 K
S[1]
11.2 to 15.8
9.73[1]

323 Brucia (/ˈbrsiə/ BREW-see-ə or /ˈbrʃə/ BREW-shə) was the first asteroid to be discovered by the use of astrophotography.[2] It was also the first of over 200 asteroids discovered by Max Wolf, a pioneer in that method of finding astronomical objects. Discovered on December 22, 1891, it was named in honour of Catherine Wolfe Bruce, a noted patroness of the science of astronomy, who had donated $10,000 for the construction of the telescope used by Wolf.

It will be an outer Mars-crossing asteroid with perihelion (q) less than 1.666 AU[1] until July 2017. For comparison, asteroid 4222 Nancita will become a Mars-crossing asteroid in June 2019. (6454) 1991 UG1 was a Mars-crossing asteroid until January 2016.[3]

It has a synodic rotation period of 9.46 hours (as of 1998).[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 323 Brucia" (2011-06-24 last obs). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 11 May 2016.  (Webcite archive for Epoch 2016)
  2. ^ Campbell, W. W. (1892). "Discovery of Asteroids by Photography". Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific 4 (26): 264. Bibcode:1892PASP....4..264C. doi:10.1086/120521. 
  3. ^ Webcite archive of asteroid 6454 with Epoch 2016
  4. ^ Piironen, J.; et al. (March 1998), "Physical studies of asteroids. XXXII. Rotation periods and UBVRI-colours for selected asteroids", Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement 128: 525–540, Bibcode:1998A&AS..128..525P, doi:10.1051/aas:1998393. 

External links[edit]