3rd Stone

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3rd Stone is a defunct British magazine devoted to "archaeology, folklore and myth" and dealing with Earth mysteries.

History and profile[edit]

The magazine was originally published under the title of Gloucestershire Earth Mysteries (G.E.M.) magazine, founded by Danny Sullivan in the mid-1980s, and the name was changed to 3rd Stone magazine in 1986.[1] The magazine was based in Cheltenham.[2] Neil Mortimer took over as editor in 1995, and edited the magazine until its closure in 2003.

3rd Stone absorbed At the Edge magazine in 1998[3] before itself ceasing publication in 2003.[4] Aubrey Burl, Ed Krupp,[5] John Michell, Paul Devereux, Jeremy Harte,[relevant? ] Rodney Castleden[relevant? ] and Stan Beckensall are among the authors who contributed to the magazine.[6] Timothy Darvill, in reviewing The Modern Antiquarian, mentioned that The 3rd Stone followed "much the same path [as that book], and [had] a rapidly increasing subscription base and considerable public following" and that it carried "articles by a wide range of authors and gives each equal weight."[7]

3rd Stone ceased publiscation with issue 47 published in 2003.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jeremy Harte (1998). "Alternative approaches to folklore. A bibliography 1969 - 1996". Hoap. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  2. ^ Larry Warren; Peter Robbins (2010). Left at East Gate: A First-hand Account of the Rendlesham Forest UFO Incident, Its Cover-up, and Investigation. Cosimo, Inc. p. 672. ISBN 978-1-60520-928-9. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  3. ^ "Special Announcement" in At the Edge No.10 June 1998
  4. ^ At the Edge Archive
  5. ^ Archaeoastronomy & Ethnoastronomy News, The Center for Archaeoastronomy
  6. ^ Contents of Issue 35
  7. ^ Timothy Darvill, A review of The modern antiquarian: A premillennia1 odyssey through megalithic Britain, by Julian Cope, Antiquity vol 73:279, 1999 pp. 236-238
  8. ^ "Are Thursdays wetter?". The Pharmaceutical Journal 280: 132. 2 February 2008. Retrieved 2 January 2016.