770 Bali

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770 Bali
770Bali (Lightcurve Inversion).png
A three-dimensional model of 770 Bali based on its light curve.
Discovery
Discovered by A. Massinger
Discovery site Heidelberg Obs.
Discovery date 31 October 1913
Designations
MPC designation (770) Bali
Named after
Bali[1] (Indonesian island)
1913 TE
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 113.62 yr (41,501 days)
Aphelion 2.5557 AU
Perihelion 1.8876 AU
2.2216 AU
Eccentricity 0.1504
3.31 yr (1,209 days)
119.08°
0° 17m 51.36s / day
Inclination 4.3849°
44.697°
18.069°
Physical characteristics
5.8199 ± 0.0001 h (0.24250 ± 4.1667×10−6 d)[3]
0.2483±0.037[2]
S (Tholen)[2]
10.9[2]

770 Bali is a minor planet orbiting the Sun. It is a member of the Flora family.[3] It was discovered on 31 October 1913, by German astronomer Adam Massinger at the Heidelberg Observatory in southwest Germany. The asteroid was named after the Indonesian island of Bali.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (770) Bali. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 73. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 19 October 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 770 Bali (1913 TE)" (2017-06-04 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 19 October 2017. 
  3. ^ a b Kryszczynska, A.; et al. (October 2012). "Do Slivan states exist in the Flora family?. I. Photometric survey of the Flora region". Astronomy & Astrophysics. 546: 51. Bibcode:2012A&A...546A..72K. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201219199. A72. 

External links[edit]