Abbot of Burton

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The Abbot of Burton was the head of Burton Abbey, the Benedictine monastery of St Mary and St Modwenna at Burton-upon-Trent in Staffordshire, England. Allegedly the church was begun by a wandering Irish holy woman, but it was actually founded c. 1003 as a Benedictine abbey by Wulfric Spott. A continuous series of abbots, which slight possible interruptions, can be traced thereafter until the English Reformation.

List of abbots[edit]

Abbots of the church of Burton
Incumbent From Until Citation(s) Notes
Wulfgeat c. 1004 c. 1026 [1] The Annals of Burton state he died Thursday 20 April 1026, after 22 years in office. This date was in fact a Wednesday, though 20 April 1027 fell on a Thursday, meaning that the source was out by a year his abbacy lasted from c. 1005 to 1027.[1]
Brihtric I c. 1027 c. 1050 [2] The Annals of Burton state he died Saturday 20 April 1050, after 24 years in office. This date was in fact a Friday.[1]
Leofric c. 1051 1066 [3] Also Abbot of Peterborough (1052–1066), as well as Coventry, Crowland, and Thorney, he was the nephew of Leofric, Earl of Mercia.[4]
Brihtric II c. 1067 1085 [3] Previously Abbot of Malmesbury, he was appointed by William the Conqueror soon after Abbot Leofric's death in either 31 October or 1 November 1066.[5]
Geoffrey de Mala Terra 1085 1094 [3] He was expelled from his position in 1094.[3]
Nigel 1094 1114 [3]
Geoffrey 1114 1150 [3]
Robert I 1150 1159 [3] He was expelled in 1159, but returned in 1176.[3]
Bernard 1160 1174 [3] Previously Abbot of Cerne[3]
Robert I (again) 1176 [3] Previously Abbot of Cerne[3]
Roger Malebranche 1177 1182 [3]
Richard 1182 1187 [3]
Nicholas 1187 1197 [3]
William Melburne 1200 1213 [3]
Stephen de Lucy 1214 [3] Elected but resigned in January 1214[6]
Roger 1214 1216 [3]
Nicholas de Wallingford 1216 1222 [7]
Richard de Insula 1222 1229 [7]
Laurence de St Edward 1229 1260 [7]
John de Stafford 1260 1281 [7]
Thomas de Packington 1281 1305 [7]
John de Burton 1305 1316 [7]
William de Bromley 1316 1329 [7]
Robert de Langdon 1329 1340 [7]
Robert de Brykhull 1340 1347 [8]
John of Ibestock 1347 1366 [8]
Thomas of Southam 1366 1400 [8]
John de Sudbury 1400 1424 [9]
William Matthewe 1424 1430 [9]
Robert Ownesby 1430 1433 [9]
Ralph Henley 1433 1455 [9]
William de Bronston 1455 1473 [9]
Thomas de Felde 1473 1493 [9]
William Fleghe 1493 1502 [9]
William Beyne 1502 1530 x 1531 [9] Associated with Abbot Beyne School
William Benson 1531 1533 [9] Became Abbot of Westminster[9]
John Beaton 1533 1534 [9]
William Edys 1534 1539 [9] Surrendered the abbey as part of the dissolution of the monasteries[9]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Knowles, Brooke,and London, Heads of Religious Houses, vol. i, p. 30
  2. ^ Knowles, Brooke,and London, Heads of Religious Houses, vol. i, pp. 30–31
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r Knowles, Brooke,and London, Heads of Religious Houses, vol. i, p. 31
  4. ^ Knowles, Brooke,and London, Heads of Religious Houses, vol. i, p. 60
  5. ^ Knowles, Brooke,and London, Heads of Religious Houses, vol. i, pp. 31, 55
  6. ^ Knowles, Brooke,and London, Heads of Religious Houses, vol. i, pp. 31, 80
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h Smith and London, Heads of Religious Houses, vol. ii, p. 25
  8. ^ a b c Smith and London, Heads of Religious Houses, vol. ii, p. 26
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Greenslade and Pugh (eds.), "The Abbey of Burton"

References[edit]

  • Knowles, David; Brooke, C. N. L.; London, C. M, eds. (1972), The Heads of Religious Houses : England and Wales. 1, 940—1216, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, ISBN 0-521-08367-2
  • Greenslade,, M. W.; Pugh, R. B., eds. (1970), "Houses of Benedictine Monks: The Abbey of Burton", A History of the County of Stafford: Volume 3, British History Online, pp. 199&ndash, 213, retrieved 2009-07-09
  • Smith, David M.; London, C. M, eds. (2001), The Heads of Religious Houses : England and Wales. 2, 1216—1377, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, ISBN 0-521-80271-7