Acetozone

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Acetozone
Acetozone.svg
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
Acetic benzoic peroxyanhydride
Other names
Acetyl benzoyl peroxide; Benzoyl acetyl peroxide; Benzozone; Acetyl benzenecarboperoxoate
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.010.376 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 211-412-7
UNII
  • InChI=1S/C9H8O4/c1-7(10)12-13-9(11)8-5-3-2-4-6-8/h2-6H,1H3
    Key: PDAVOLCVHOKLEO-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • CC(=O)OOC(=O)c1ccccc1
Properties
C9H8O4
Molar mass 180.159 g·mol−1
Appearance White crystalline solid[1]
Melting point 36–37 °C (97–99 °F; 309–310 K)[2]
Boiling point 130 °C (266 °F; 403 K)[2] (19 mmHg)
Soluble in carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, ether, and oils[2]
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Acetozone is an organic peroxide that is a strong oxidant.[1][3]

In the early 20th century, it found use as a surgical antiseptic[4] and for the treatment of typhoid fever.[5]

It has also been used as a bleaching agent for flour.[2][6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Acetozone". Oxford Dictionaries. Archived from the original on February 24, 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d Merck Index (12th ed.). p. 15. 78.
  3. ^ "Acetozone". Guidechem.
  4. ^ Gore-Gillon, G; Hewlett, R. T (1917). "Acetozone As a General Surgical Antiseptic". British Medical Journal. 2 (2955): 209–10. doi:10.1136/bmj.2.2955.209. PMC 2355305. PMID 20768694.
  5. ^ Humiston, RAY (1906). "Acetozone in Typhoid Fever". JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association (20): 1651. doi:10.1001/jama.1906.25210200047002.
  6. ^ "Acetyl benzoyl peroxide" (PDF). Hazardous Substance Fact Sheets. New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services.