Adam McKeown

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Adam M. McKeown (1965–2017) was a historian of transnational migration.

Biography[edit]

Born in San Francisco, McKeown earned his PhD in history at the University of Chicago in 1997.[1] His dissertation, later published as Chinese Migrant Networks and Cultural Change,[2] studied Chinese migrants in Chicago, Peru, and Hawaii, and highlighted the transnational networks developed by migrant flow.[3] In his important 2004 article "Global Migration, 1846–1940," McKeown showed Asian migration was comparable to its contemporary transatlantic migration.[4] His later monograph Melancholy Order looked at border control as historically resulting from the attempt to control Asian migration in the 1880s.[5]

McKeown taught at Northeastern University, followed by Columbia University, where he became a full professor.[1] In 2013, McKeown gave up his tenured position due to his frustration with academic politics.[3]

McKeown had an accidental death on September 3, 2017.[1]

Works[edit]

  • McKeown, Adam (2001). Chinese Migrant Networks and Cultural Change: Peru, Chicago, and Hawaii 1900-1936. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. ISBN 978-0-226-56024-3.
  • McKeown, Adam (2011). Melancholy Order: Asian Migration and the Globalization of Borders. New York: Columbia University Press. ISBN 978-0-231-14077-5.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Dunch, Ryan (26 September 2017). "Dr. Adam McKeown". H-Asia. Retrieved 28 April 2018.
  2. ^ McKeown, Adam (2001). Chinese Migrant Networks and Cultural Change: Peru, Chicago, and Hawaii 1900-1936. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. ISBN 978-0-226-56024-3.
  3. ^ a b Connelly, Matthew (December 2017). "In Memoriam: Adam McKeown (1965–2017)". American Historical Association. Retrieved 28 April 2018.
  4. ^ McKeown, Adam (2004). "Global Migration, 1846-1940". Journal of World History. 15 (2): 155–189. JSTOR 20068611.
  5. ^ McKeown, Adam (2011). Melancholy Order: Asian Migration and the Globalization of Borders. New York: Columbia University Press. ISBN 978-0-231-14077-5.