Adenosine thiamine triphosphate

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Adenosine thiamine triphosphate
Adenosine thiamine triphosphate.png
Names
IUPAC name
3-((4-amino-2-methylpyrimidin-5-yl)methyl)-5-(2-(((((((((2R,3S,4R,5R)-5-(6-amino-9H-purin-9-yl)-3,4-dihydroxytetrahydrofuran-2-yl)methoxy)(hydroxy)phosphoryl)oxy)(hydroxy)phosphoryl)oxy)(hydroxy)phosphoryl)oxy)ethyl)-4-methylthiazol-3-ium
Other names
P1,P3-(Adenosine-5'-thiamine) triphosphate
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChemSpider
MeSH adenosine+thiamine+triphosphate
Properties
C22H31N9O13P3S
Molar mass 754.52 g·mol−1
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Adenosine thiamine triphosphate (AThTP), or thiaminylated adenosine triphosphate, is a natural thiamine adenine nucleotide.[1] It was discovered in Escherichia coli where it may account for up to 15 - 20% of total thiamine under carbon starvation. AThTP exists also, though at much lower levels, in eukaryotic organisms such as yeast, roots of higher plants and animal tissues. It was found to exist in small amounts in the muscle, heart, brain, kidneys and liver of mice.[2]

In E. coli AThTP is synthesized from thiamine diphosphate (ThDP) according to the following reaction catalyzed by thiamine diphosphate adenylyl transferase:[3]

ThDP + ATP (ADP) ↔ AThTP + PPi (Pi)

Structure and function[edit]

The molecule is made up of thiamine and adenosine joined together with phosphate groups. It is similar in structure to NAD+. The function of AThTP is not currently know but it has been shown to inhibit the activity of PARP-1.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bettendorff L, Wirtzfeld B, Makarchikov AF, et al. (2007). "Discovery of a natural thiamine adenine nucleotide". Nat. Chem. Biol. 3 (4): 211–2. doi:10.1038/nchembio867. PMID 17334376. 
  2. ^ a b Tanaka T, Yamamoto D, Sato T, Tanaka S, Usui K, Manabe M, Aoki Y, Iwashima Y, Saito Y, Mino Y, Deguchi H (2011). "Adenosine thiamine triphosphate (AThTP) inhibits poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1(PARP-1) activity". J Nutr Sci Vitaminol (Tokyo). 57 (2): 192–6. PMID 21697640. 
  3. ^ Makarchikov AF, Brans A & Bettendorff L (2007). "Thiamine diphosphate adenylyl transferase from E. coli: functional characterization of the enzyme synthesizing adenosine thiamine triphosphate". BMC Biochem. 8: 17. doi:10.1186/1471-2091-8-17. PMC 1976097Freely accessible. PMID 17705845. 

External links[edit]