After School (app)

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After School[1] is an iOS and Android, social network mobile application that allows users in a defined network, currently high schools, to share anonymous text-based posts and images with others.[2] As of July 2016, After School had users at more than 20,000 american high schools.[3]

According to CEO Michael Callahan, the app was created as a network “that teens could use to express themselves, to reach out to others and to ask for and offer help to fellow teens in distress.”[4]

The app, created by Michael Callahan and Cory Levy of ONE, Inc., debuted in mid-November 2014. In the re-release of the app in April 2015,[5] After School implemented “mature content” filters, age verification, 24/7 live anonymous support, and FIRST (Fastest Internet Response System for Threats).[6] In February 2016, After School announced raising a $16.4 million Series A round.[4] The app also detects threatening or harmful messages using "language algorithms"[7] and "enforces a single-report immediate user removal for violations."[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "AfterSchool". afterschoolapp.com. Archived from the original on 2014-11-25. Retrieved 2015-10-23.
  2. ^ Wagner, Kurt. "Who Is Behind After School, the Anonymous App Taking Over American High Schools?". recode.com. re/code. Retrieved 22 October 2015.
  3. ^ "Crisis Text Line Brings Help to Troubled Teens Where They Live — Their Phones". Retrieved 2016-09-22.
  4. ^ a b journalist, Larry Magid Technology (2016-02-03). "After School App Designed to Promote Kindness Say Founders | Huffington Post". The Huffington Post. Retrieved 2016-09-22.
  5. ^ Larson, Selena. "After School attempts a comeback with bans on bullying". Dailydot.com. The Daily Dot. Retrieved 22 October 2015.
  6. ^ "First". AfterSchoolApp.com. After School. Archived from the original on 12 January 2015. Retrieved 22 October 2015.
  7. ^ Thadani, Trisha (2018-01-29). "Anonymous app for teens tries to keep bullying at bay". San Francisco Chronicle.
  8. ^ Polarchy, Michael (2018-02-28). "After School app raises concerns of bullying, inappropriate activity". Fox 8.