American Society of Journalists and Authors

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The American Society of Journalists and Authors (ASJA) was founded in 1948 as the Society of Magazine Writers, and is the professional association of independent nonfiction writers in the United States.


The organization was established in 1948 as the Society of Magazine Writers.[1] In 2009 ASJA objected to the Google Book Search Settlement Agreement for authors.[2] In March 2009, ASJA changed their policy regarding self-published authors.[3] In June 2015 the membership criteria were revised slightly to include nonfiction writing in more kinds of markets, and nonbylined work as well.[4]


ASJA offers extensive benefits and services focusing on professional development, including regular confidential market information, meetings with editors and others in the field, an exclusive referral service, seminars and workshops, discount services and, above all, the opportunity for members to explore professional issues and concerns with their peers. ASJA is a primary voice in representing freelance writers' interests, serving as spokesman for their right to control and profit from uses of their work in new media and otherwise. Services and resources available to the public include publications, events, mentoring services and more. Editors and others can search the membership to hire experienced nonfiction writers for any need. ASJA is a member of the Authors Coalition of America [1] which repatriates foreign royalties and distributes to American authors or their representatives. All members are automatically enrolled into the Authors Registry [2]

The Society offers a number of services to the public, including:

  • A mentoring program for beginning journalists.[5]
  • ASJA Weekly, a free weekly news brief that gathers items of interest to independent writers and others in the fields of publishing, communications, content marketing, and more.[6]
  • The Writers Emergency Assistance Fund (WEAF) offers financial grants to writers in need. [3]
  • A database of willing members available to write on almost any nonfiction topic in almost any nonfiction venue or genre. [4]
  • An associated Freelance Writer Search that permits editors and publishers to advertise jobs to the entire ASJA membership, as well as obtain counseling on writing projects, budgeting, terms, and talent. [5]
  • Guidance for freelance writers to help with sticky professional situations, including late or non-payment of fees. [6]

See also[edit]


  1. ^ "About ASJA". American Society of Journalists and Authors. Retrieved 2007-11-12. Founded in 1948, the American Society of Journalists and Authors is the nation's professional organization of independent nonfiction writers. Our membership consists of more than 1,100 outstanding freelance writers of magazine articles, trade books, and many other forms of nonfiction writing, each of whom has met ASJA's exacting standards of professional achievement. 
  2. ^ "Lawyer and Author Adds His Objections to Settling the Google Book Lawsuit". New York Times. August 18, 2009. Retrieved 2010-11-16. Objections to the settlement have been raised by groups including the National Writers Union, the American Society of Journalists and Authors, ... 
  3. ^ "ASJA self-published members". American Society of Journalists and Authors. Retrieved 2011-02-22. The new policy, which a short while ago appeared on the public section of our website, reads as follows: "In general, self-published books are not accepted as qualifying material for ASJA membership. An exception may be made on rare occasion for self-published books with substantial sales, reviews in well-known journals, or inclusion in a major book club." 
  4. ^ "ASJA | The American Society of Journalists and Authors". Retrieved 2015-10-15. 
  5. ^ "ASJA Personal Mentoring Program". Retrieved 2015-10-15. 
  6. ^ "The ASJA Weekly Archive". Retrieved 2015-10-15. 

External links[edit]