Amy Wright (writer)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Amy Wright
Amy Wright Author.jpg
BornWytheville, Virginia, US
OccupationWriter, professor, editor, publisher
Alma mater
  • University of Virginia (BA)
  • University of Colorado, Boulder (MA)
  • University of Denver (PhD)
GenrePoetry, non-fiction

Amy Wright is an American writer and editor.

Early life and education[edit]

Wright was born in the Blue Ridge Mountains of southwest Virginia. She received a B.A. in English from the University of Virginia in 1997, an M.A. in English from the University of Colorado, Boulder, and a Ph.D. from the University of Denver.[1] In 2007, she joined the Creative Writing faculty of Austin Peay State University.[1]

Writing[edit]

Wright's poetry appears in the Southern Poetry Anthology series, Volume III: Contemporary Appalachia, and Volume VI, Tennessee.[2] Her first chapbook, There Are No New Ways to Kill a Man, was published by Apostrophe Books.[3] Her second chapbook, Farm, was published by Finishing Line Press,[4] and her third, The Garden Will Give You A Fat Lip, won the 2012 Pavement Saw Chapbook Contest.[5] Her fourth chapbook, Rhinestones in the Bed, or Cracker Crumbs, was published in 2014 by Dancing Girl Press. Her fifth chapbook, Wherever the Land Is, was published by MIEL Books in 2016. Her sixth, Think I'll Go Eat a Worm was published by Iris Press in 2019.[6]

Wright’s essays supporting entomophagy appear in Kenyon Review,[7] Gastronomica: The Journal of Food and Culture, and Passages North.[8] Other nonfiction has been published by Brevity,[9] Denver Quarterly, DIAGRAM, Quarter After Eight, and Tupelo Quarterly Review.[10]

Editing[edit]

In 2007, Wright joined the editorial staff of Zone 3 journal and Zone 3 Press as Nonfiction Editor.[11]

Reviews[edit]

In a review of Rhinestones in the Bed, or Cracker Crumbs for Wilderness House Literary Review, Tom Daley writes: "Flirting with cultural clichés about a particular class of people makes for a risky project, especially in poetry, but Wright probes the pigeonhole, plucks its feathers, and scoops its guano with a brave and unabashed delight."[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Beard, Chuck. "East Side Storytellin' 41: The Night Sara Marie Thompson and Amy Wright had Outdoor Church on Tuesday". East Side Storytellin'. Retrieved 21 November 2014.
  2. ^ "Volume 6". Southern Poetry Anthology.
  3. ^ Wright, Amy. "There Are No New Ways To Kill A Man". Apostrophe Books. Retrieved 3 December 2014.
  4. ^ Wright, Amy. "Farm". Finishing Line Press. Retrieved 3 December 2014.
  5. ^ "Directory of Writers". Poets & Writers Magazine. Retrieved 22 November 2014.
  6. ^ "Think I'll Go Eat a Worm". Iris Press. Retrieved 2019-03-14.
  7. ^ Wright, Amy. "An Arch Under the Instep: Sven Birkertsʼ The Other Walk". www.kenyonreview.org. The Kenyon Review. Retrieved 3 December 2014.
  8. ^ Wright, Amy. "Mǣl". passagesnorth.com. Passages North. Retrieved 3 December 2014.
  9. ^ Wright, Amy. "The Bedroom that was a Beekeeper's House". brevitymag.com. Brevity. Retrieved 4 December 2014.
  10. ^ Wright, Amy. "Opposite Daring: Prose Translations of Sappho". www.tupeloquarterly.com. Tupelo Quarterly. Retrieved 4 December 2014.
  11. ^ Reiter, Jendi. "Insights From Editors and Judges". winningwirters.com. Winning Writers. Retrieved 5 December 2014.
  12. ^ Daley, Tom. "Review: Rhinestones in the Bed, or Cracker Crumbs" (PDF). Wilderness House Literary Review.