Roman Catholic Diocese of Oloron

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The former Catholic Diocese of Oloron in south-west France was suppressed after the French Revolution, by the Concordat of 1801. It dated from the 6th century, but its territory became part of the diocese of Bayonne.

The Way of St James passes through Oloron going to Santiago.[1]

Notable buildings[edit]

The seat of the bishops of Oloron was in Oloron Cathedral in Oloron-Sainte-Marie, now in Pyrénées-Atlantiques. The cathedral has now reverted to a parish church.

The former Oloron Cathedral, now St Mary's Church.

Another significant building is Chateau de Lamothe, dating from the early 12th century, when a Moorish fortification on the hill,[2] was destroyed as the French drove the Moorish forces from France, and rebuilt to serve as the summer residence for the bishops of Oloron, a role it filled for 600 years.[3][4]


Bishops[edit]

  • c. 506: Saint Grat
  • c. 551: Agustius (?)
  • c. 573 to c. 585: Lezer
  • c. 653: Abientius
  • c. 659: Zozime
  • c. 661: Tructémonde
  • c. 668: Arcontius
  • c. 850: Gérard
  • c. 977: Gombaud
  • c. 992: Arsius Raca
  • 1033–1050: Raymond I. le Vieux (also Bishop of Bayonne and Bishop of Lescar)
  • 1060–1078: Etienne de Mauléon
  • 1078–1083: Amat
  • 1083–1101: Odon de Bénac
  • 1102–1114: Roger I. de Sentes
  • 1114–1135: Arnaud I. d'Araux
  • 1135–1168: Arnaud II. d'Izeste
  • 1169–1195: Bernard I. de Sadirac
  • 1196–1216: Bernard II. de Morlane
  • c. 1225: Bernard III.
  • 1228–1241: Guillaume I. de Castanet
  • 1242–1254: Pierre I. de Gavarret
  • c. 1255: Guillaume II. de Gaujac
  • 1256–1259: Roger II.
  • 1260–1283: Compaing
  • 1284–1288: Bernard IV. de La Mothe
  • 1289–1308: Guillard de Leduix (or Gérard I. de Leduix)
  • c. 1308: Pierre-Raymond de Monein
  • 1309–1322: Guillaume-Arnaud I.
  • 1323–1341: Arnaud III. de Valensun
  • 1342–1347: Bernard V. d'En Julia
  • 1348–1370: Pierre II. d'Estiron
  • 1371–1395: Guillaume III. d'Assat
  • c. 1396: Armand-Guilhem de Bury (Avignon nomination)
  • Pierre Laforgue (?) (Avignon nomination)
  • c. 1404: Sance I. Muller (Avignon nomination)
  • c. 1396: Ogier Vilesongnes (?) (Rome nomination)
  • c. 1404: Pierre III. de Montbrun (Rome nomination, Administrator)
  • c. 1412–1417: Pierre IV. Salet (Rome nomination)
  • 1417–1421: Pierre IV. Salet (Schism resolved)
  • 1422–1426: Guicharnaud (or Guillaume-Arnaud II.)
  • 1426–1434: Guiraux d'Araux (or Gérard II. d'Araux)
  • 1435–1450: Arnaud-Raymond I. d'Espagne
  • 1450–1465: Garsias I. de Faudoas
  • 1466–1475: Garsias II. de La Mothe
  • 1475–1491: Sance II. de Casenave
  • 1494–1499: Jean I. de Pardailhan
  • 1497-1506: Cardinal Juan López (Administrator)
  • 1507–1519: Arnaud-Raymond II. de Béon (Cardinal Amanieu d'Albret, Administrator)
  • c. 1520: Cardinal Jean Salviati (Administrator)
  • 1521–1534: Jacques de Foix
  • 1539–1555: Gérard Roussel
  • 1550–1580: Claude Orégon
  • 1599–1623: Arnaud IV. de Maytie
  • 1623–1646: Arnaud V. de Maytie
  • 1647: Louis de Bassompierre
  • 1648–1652: Pierre V. de Gassion
  • 1653–1658: Jean III. de Miossens-Sansons
  • 1661–1682?: Arnaud-François de Maytie
  • 1682–1704: Charles de Salettes
  • 1704: Antoine de Maigny
  • 1705–1735: Joseph de Révol
  • 1735–1742: Jean-François de Montillet de Grenaud
  • 1742–1783: François de Révol
  • 1783–1790: Jean-Baptiste-Auguste de Villoutreix
  • 26 April 1791 − 1793: Barthélémy-Jean-Baptiste Sanadon

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ the Arles route
  2. ^ hence the town's name: Moumour = Mount Moor.
  3. ^ During the French revolution Chateau de Lamothe was once again destroyed and rebuilt to become the home of the Lamothe family, who lived there until 1956. It later became a holiday colony for children of the local paper factory's employees. For years it was abandoned until it was acquired by Christine and Laurent Nederlof, who created a retreat.
  4. ^ Moumour, Oloron Sainte Marie at The International Kitchen.com

Bibliography[edit]

Reference works[edit]

Studies[edit]