Angela Rose

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Angela Rose
Born Angela Rose [1]
(1978-09-01) September 1, 1978 (age 38)
Oak Park, Illinois
Residence Arlington, Virginia
Nationality American
Other names Angela Rose
'
Education Lake Park High School, Illinois (class of 1996)
Alma mater University of Wisconsin–Madison (B.A., 2002)
Occupation Real estate agent

Angela Rose[2][3][4] (born September 1, 1978) is an American activist known for publicizing her story of being kidnapped and sexually assaulted by Robert Koppa at age 17 in 1996 in Wauconda, Illinois. She is the founder and executive director of the nonprofit PAVE: Promoting Awareness, Victim Empowerment.

Activism[edit]

Kidnapping and assault[edit]

Rose was kidnapped by Robert Koppa at knife point on July 13, 1996 from the Woodfield Mall in Schaumburg, Illinois where she worked when she was seventeen years old.[5] She was driven to a forest preserve in Wauconda, Illinois and sexually assaulted. Koppa then drove her to a parking garage, set her free and told her to count to 100. Koppa was on parole for murder when he kidnapped her.[6]

Rose has appeared on an episode of 48 Hours: Live To Tell called "I Remember Everything" (aired October 21, 2014 on CBS), The Montel Williams Show, I Survived..., The John Walsh Show, and newscasts across the country promoting her organization PAVE. Rose presented workshops and gave speeches at conferences, military trainings, and on college campuses.[when?]

PAVE: Promoting Awareness, Victim Empowerment[edit]

Rose founded PAVE: Promoting Awareness, Victim Empowerment in 2001.[7] PAVE uses education and action to shatter the silence of sexual violence. PAVE's work has been illustrated on CNN and The Today Show. PAVE has created educational programming and tools as well as grassroots action campaigns. Rose produced a documentary called, Transition to Survivor, in which sexual assault survivors tell their stories, from reporting the crimes to dealing with the aftermath of the violence. In the film, one woman talks about "blocking" her memories, becoming anorexic and self-harming. Another cries and talks of suicide. Eventually all the survivors went through counseling, friends, and family support.[8] PAVE's Survivor Justice Campaign aims to bring awareness to perceived acts of misconduct towards victims of sexual assault throughout the criminal justice process.

Binding Project[edit]

Through PAVE, Rose launched the Binding Project: Breaking Old Binds, Creating New Ties. The Binding Project is an international art empowerment campaign where participants write a word of empowerment on plastic zip ties, one to wear and one to send back to PAVE to be included in an installation art piece. This project was launched on the anniversary[when?] of the day Rose was abducted – the zip ties were what was used to bind her hands behind her back when she was kidnapped.[9]

Awards[edit]

Personal life[edit]

Rose graduated from the University of Wisconsin–Madison in 2002.[10][11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Elizabeth Neff (July 12, 2000). "Sex Offender's Sentence Fulfills One Victim's Vow". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved January 18, 2015. Shortly after being abducted at knifepoint and forced into a car in the parking lot of Woodfield Shopping Center in Schaumburg, Angela Bartucci made a silent promise that has changed her life and countless other lives throughout the state. "I made a vow to myself that if I lived through this nightmare, whoever victimized me would never hurt anyone else," Bartucci told a hushed courtroom Tuesday in Rolling Meadows shortly before the man who sexually attacked her was given life in prison without parole. 
  2. ^ Elizabeth Neff (July 12, 2000). "Sex Offender's Sentence Fulfills One Victim's Vow". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved January 18, 2015. Shortly after being abducted at knifepoint and forced into a car in the parking lot of Woodfield Shopping Center in Schaumburg, Angela Bartucci made a silent promise that has changed her life and countless other lives throughout the state. "I made a vow to myself that if I lived through this nightmare, whoever victimized me would never hurt anyone else," Bartucci told a hushed courtroom Tuesday in Rolling Meadows shortly before the man who sexually attacked her was given life in prison without parole. 
  3. ^ 48 Hours (October 25, 2014). ""48 HOURS" LIVE TO TELL: I REMEMBER EVERYTHING". CBS News. Retrieved January 18, 2015. 
  4. ^ 48 Hours. "The evidence: Catching Robert Koppa Clues from the Car". CBS News. Retrieved January 18, 2015. 
  5. ^ Elizabeth Neff (July 12, 2000). "Sex Offender's Sentence Fulfills One Victim's Vow". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved January 18, 2015. Shortly after being abducted at knifepoint and forced into a car in the parking lot of Woodfield Shopping Center in Schaumburg, Angela Bartucci made a silent promise that has changed her life and countless other lives throughout the state. "I made a vow to myself that if I lived through this nightmare, whoever victimized me would never hurt anyone else," Bartucci told a hushed courtroom Tuesday in Rolling Meadows shortly before the man who sexually attacked her was given life in prison without parole. 
  6. ^ Elizabeth Neff (July 12, 2000). "Sex Offender's Sentence Fulfills One Victim's Vow". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved January 18, 2015. Koppa was sentenced in 1983 to 30 years in prison for the murder, rape and kidnapping as part of a plea bargain. He served 13 years, and it was while he was on parole that he attacked Bartucci. 
  7. ^ PAVE
  8. ^ [1]
  9. ^ [2]
  10. ^ Scott Gaspari (Oct 18, 2001). "Sexual awareness examined". The Badger Herald. Retrieved January 18, 2015. UW senior Angela Bartucci, PAVE founder, said sexual-assault awareness is important on college campuses. “A survivor who does not tell anyone is much worse off in the long run,” Bartucci said. 
  11. ^ Wisconsin Alumni Association (March 1, 2010). "2010 Forward under 40 Award Honoree". uwalumni.com. Retrieved January 18, 2015. 

External links[edit]