Anna Christy

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Anna Christy is an American soprano opera singer.[1] She studied at Rice University's Shepherd School of Music and University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music and made her debut in 2000 at New York City Opera as Papagena.[2]

Christy sings a variety of lyric roles, such as Susanna, Papagena and Cleopatra, but especially coloratura roles such as Cunegonde in Candide and Oscar in Un ballo in maschera. She made her Metropolitan Opera debut in the 2004/5 season, and has sung with the Santa Fe Opera in Bright Sheng's Madame Mao,[2] Lyric Opera of Chicago, San Francisco Opera,[3] L'Opéra National de Paris, and the Royal Opera House, London.[4] She has also performed Bianca in Rossini’s Bianca e Falliero with the Washington Concert Opera.[5]

In February 2010 she reprised her original 2008 interpretation[6] of the title role in Donizetti's Lucia di Lammermoor for English National Opera.[7]

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ "What’s under that skirt? Chicago Lyric Opera’s coloratura Anna Christy kicks Olympia into top gear" Chicago On The Aisle. Retrieved 2015-3-31.
  2. ^ a b Ben Mattison, "Soprano Anna Christy Wins Lincoln Center's Segal Award", Playbillarts online at playbillarts.com, 23 Apr 2005
  3. ^ San Francisco Opera's page on Anna Christy. Archived January 2, 2010, at the Wayback Machine. It notes that she made her debut there "as Angel More (The Mother of Us All) in 2003 and subsequently returned as Oscar (Un ballo in maschera) in 2006 and Lisette (La Rondine) in 2007
  4. ^ Personal website Archived November 10, 2015, at the Wayback Machine.
  5. ^ "ANNA CHRISTY Soprano". www.annachristy.com. Archived from the original on 2015-11-10. Retrieved 2015-09-09. 
  6. ^ Ruth Elleson, "Anna Christy Triumphs in Lucia di Lammermoor, 20 February 2008 on operatoday.com which notes: "Anna Christy's remarkable physical portrayal and crystalline soprano....make her utterly convincing as this troubled, abused young girl. There is something other-worldly about her voice, and its partnership with the glass harmonica (restored to the Mad Scene as Donizetti intended) creates a chilling resonance".
  7. ^ Rupert Christiansen, "Donizetti's Lucia di Lammermoor at ENO comes up blazingly fresh in this revival of David Alden's production", The Telegraph (London) online at telegraph.co.uk, 5 Feb 2010

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