Anne Gallagher

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Anne Therese Gallagher AO
President of the International Catholic Migration Commission
Assumed office
March 2018
Preceded by Peter Sutherland GCIH KCMG SC
Academic Expert at Doughty Street Chambers
Assumed office
2016
Member: IOM Migration Advisory Board
Assumed office
2014
Member: Asia Dialogue on Forced Migration
Assumed office
2014
Co-Chair of the International Bar Association's Presidential Force on Human Trafficking
In office
2014–2016

Anne Therese Gallagher AO[1][2] is the President of the International Catholic Migration Commission. An Australian born lawyer, practitioner and scholar, she is considered to be an international authority on human rights and gender issues[3][4][5][6] and, according to the 2012 Trafficking in Persons Report prepared by the United States Department of State, is ‘the leading global expert on the international law on human trafficking’.[7]

Education[edit]

As an undergraduate Gallagher studied at Macquarie University, Sydney, graduating with a Bachelor of Arts (Political Science and International Relations) in 1984 and a Bachelor of Laws in 1987.[8] She completed a Master of International Law at the Australian National University in 1991.[9] In 2006 Gallagher obtained a Doctor of Philosophy from the University of Utrecht, Netherlands.[10]

Career history[edit]

Gallagher was admitted as a solicitor of the Supreme Court of New South Wales in 1988 and as a barrister and solicitor of the High Court of Australia in 1988 and of the Supreme Court of the Australian Capital Territory in 1990.

From 1990 to 1992 Gallagher was a lecturer in the Australian National University's Graduate International Law Program.

She is a former United Nations Official (1992–2003) and was Adviser to Mary Robinson, the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, from 1998 to 2002.[11] During her tenure as Adviser, Gallagher represented Mary Robinson at the negotiations for the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime as well as its protocols on trafficking and migrant smuggling.[12] In 2001–2002 she led the development of the United Nations Principles and Guidelines on Human Rights and Human Trafficking and during that same period was the founding Chair of the United Nations Inter-Agency Group on Human Trafficking and Migrant Smuggling.[13]

Since 2003, Gallagher has led a high profile and sensitive regional development initiative,[14] funded by the Australian Government Aid Agency AusAID,[15] aimed at strengthening legislative and criminal justice responses to trafficking in persons and related exploitation in all ten Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Member States.[16][17] The US State Department cited Gallagher's contribution to this Project, which they note has been ‘widely acclaimed for its positive impact on laws, policies and practices within and outside the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) region’.[12] The ASEAN Secretary-General, Dr Surin Pitsuwan, also noted Gallagher's contribution, stating that: ‘Dr Gallagher's expertise in this field, particularly in the area of criminal justice responses to trafficking, is recognised and deeply appreciated throughout the ASEAN region. … It is not wrong to say that the achievements that ASEAN, as a region, is enjoying in the criminal justice response to the heinous crime of trafficking are in no small part due to Dr Gallagher’s persevering efforts and her compassion towards ASEAN.'[18][19]

Gallagher is also an independent, self-funded scholar with a compelling research and publications record on areas related to human rights, criminal justice and the rule of law, and the international law on human trafficking.[20][21] In addition to numerous articles in major journals, including the International Criminal Justice Review,[22] Human Rights Quarterly,[23] Virginia Journal of International Law[24] and the Anti-Trafficking Review,[25] [26][27][28][29][30] Gallagher is the author of The International Law of Human Trafficking[31] published by Cambridge University Press and awarded the 2011 American Society of International Law Certificate of Merit – Honorable Mention.[32] She is also the lead author of the companion volume "The International Law of Migrant Smuggling"[33] published by Cambridge University Press and described, by the American Journal of International Law, as "a tour de force" [34]

A frequent panellist, expert and rapporteur at international and national governmental and non-governmental consultations, meetings, workshops and other fora,[35][36] Gallagher has also been invited to be a guest speaker and lecturer at universities around the world,[10][37][38] and commented for,[20][39] or cited by, media.[40][41] She frequently contributes opinion pieces to mainstream outlets including The Guardian and the World Economic Forum. [42] [43] Gallagher is also a regular, critical commentator on the annual US State Department Trafficking in Persons Report, [44][45][46]and has been openly scathing of related efforts to quantify the problem of 'modern slavery' and assess national responses.[47][48][49] Gallagher has reported being threatened with legal action following her criticism,[50] in the Huffington Post, of "a US-based organization that stages high profile, ethically compromised 'rescue' operations in improverished countries".[51] Since 2014, Gallagher has been a semi-regular contributor to The Spectator magazine, [52] writing on a range of topics including the United Nations, [53] freedom of speech,[54] and migration.[55] [56]

Gallagher continues to work for the United Nations as a consultant and adviser. Her major outputs include the commentary to the United Nations Recommended Principles and Guidelines on Human Rights and Human Trafficking[57] and a series of legal issue papers produced by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime: Abuse of a position of vulnerability and other “means” within the definition of trafficking in persons; "The role of "consent" in the trafficking in persons Protocol "; "The concept of exploitation in the trafficking in persons Protocol"; and "The Concept of Financial or other Material Benefit in the Smuggling of Migrants Protocol".

Recognition, Awards and Appointments[edit]

Gallagher was the recipient of the Anti-Slavery Australia Freedom Award in 2011.[58] In June 2012 she was appointed Officer of the Order of Australia (AO), that country's second-highest civic honour.[59][60] This appointment was made for her: ‘distinguished service to the law, and to human rights, as a practitioner, teacher and scholar, particularly in the areas of human trafficking responses and criminal justice.’[2] Also in June 2012, she was named a “2012 TIP Report Hero” by the United States Government for her work in the global fight against human trafficking.[7][61][62][63]

Anne Gallagher is an Australian National University Alumni Award recipient - receiving the inaugural Alumnus of the Year award in 2013. Her work has also been recognised by human rights and women's groups. In 2015 she received the Australian Centenary Peacewoman Award from the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom. The same year she was made an International Honorary Life Member of Zonta International.

Gallagher has been appointed to a number of formal advisory positions. In 2014 she commenced as Co-Chair of the International Bar Association's Presidential Task Force on Human Trafficking. Also in 2014 she was appointed to the International Migration Organization's Migration Advisory Board, convened by its Director-General, William Lacey Swing. In 2016 Gallagher joined Doughty Street Chambers - one of the largest civil liberties legal firms in the world – as an Academic Expert. She is also a founding member of the Asia Dialogue on Forced Migration.

In March 2018, Gallagher was elected President [64] of the International Catholic Migration Commission,[65] the first woman to take this role since the Commission's founding in 1951. In her public pronouncements as President, Gallagher has called for an "honest dialogue" on migration to confront the "globalization of indifference".[66]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Taylor-Kabbaz, Amy. "Queen's Birthday Honour for human trafficking campaigner". 702 ABC Sydney. ABC. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  2. ^ a b Government House. "The Queen's Birthday 2012 Honours" (PDF). Government House. 
  3. ^ World Vision. "An inspiring Australian". Action News. World Vision. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  4. ^ Law Report. "Slavery in the 21st Century". Radio National Law Report. ABC. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  5. ^ Law Council of Australia (2011). Consultation on the Criminal Justice Response to Slavery and People Trafficking; Reparation and Vulnerable Witness Protections, Submission to: Attorney-General’s Department, Australian Government 3 March 2011. Canberra: Law Council of Australia. p. 10. 
  6. ^ Harvard Law School. "Career Pathways in International Human Rights with Anne T.Gallagher". American Constitution Society. Harvard Law School. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  7. ^ a b Trafficking in Persons Report 2012, Office to Combat and Monitor Trafficking in Persons. "2012 TIP Report Heroes". U.S. Department of State. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  8. ^ Macquarie University, Alumni. "Queen's Birthday Honours". Macquarie University. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  9. ^ Human Rights Quarterly (1997). "Contributors". Human Rights Quarterly. 19 (2): 459–460. doi:10.1353/hrq.1997.0013. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  10. ^ a b FORA.tv. "FORA.tv Speaker – Anne T. Gallagher". FORA.tv. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  11. ^ Hutton, Cathy, ed. (March 2000). "Newsletter" (PDF). Centre for International and Public Law, Faculty of Law, Australian National University (1). Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  12. ^ a b Trafficking in Persons Report 2012, Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons. "2012 TIP Report Heroes". U.S. State Department. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  13. ^ Forced Migration Review. "Trafficking, Smuggling and Human Rights: Tricks and Treaties". Media Monitors Network. Forced Migration Review. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  14. ^ Asia Regional Trafficking in Persons (ARTIP) Project. "Asia Regional Trafficking in Persons (ARTIP) Project". ARTIP. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  15. ^ AusAID. "Working to combat human trafficking and labour exploitation". AusAID. Australian Government. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  16. ^ Castan Centre for Human Rights Law. "Human Rights 2004: The Year in Review". Castan Centre for Human Rights Law. Monash University. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  17. ^ IntLawGrrls, voices on international law, policy, practice. "Today's Guest Bloggers: Anne Gallagher and Elaine Pearson". IntLawGrrls. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  18. ^ Cambridge University Press. "The International Law of Human Trafficking, Reviews". Cambridge University Press. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  19. ^ Fishpond. "The International Law of Human Trafficking". Fishpond. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  20. ^ a b Gallagher, Anne (15 May 2008). "A question of bondage". The Age. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  21. ^ Action News. "An inspiring Australian". Action News. World Vision. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  22. ^ Gallagher, A.; Holmes, P. (1 September 2008). "Developing an Effective Criminal Justice Response to Human Trafficking: Lessons From the Front Line". International Criminal Justice Review. 18 (3): 318–343. doi:10.1177/1057567708320746. SSRN 1292563Freely accessible. 
  23. ^ Gallagher, Anne; Pearson,Elaine (1 January 2009). "The High Cost of Freedom: A Legal and Policy Analysis of Shelter Detention for Victims of Trafficking". Human Rights Quarterly. 32 (1): 73–114. doi:10.1353/hrq.0.0136. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  24. ^ Gallagher, Anne (1 May 2008). "Human Rights and Human Trafficking: Quagmire or Firm Ground?". Virginia Journal of International Law. 49 (4): 789–848. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  25. ^ Gallagher, Anne; Surtees, Rebecca (June 2012). "Measuring the success of counter-trafficking interventions in the criminal justice sector: Who decides—and how?". Anti-Trafficking Review. 1 (1): 10–31. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  26. ^ Gallagher, Anne (2015). "Two Cheers for the Trafficking Protocol". Anti-Trafficking Review (4): 14–32. Retrieved 3 June 2018. 
  27. ^ Gallagher, Anne (2012). "Editorial". Anti-Trafficking Review (1). Retrieved 3 June 2018. 
  28. ^ Gallagher, Anne (2017). "What's Wrong with the Global Slavery Index?". Anti-Trafficking Review (8): 90–112. Retrieved 3 June 2018. 
  29. ^ Gallagher, Anne (2012). "Editorial". Anti-Trafficking Review (1). Retrieved 3 June 2018. 
  30. ^ Gallagher, Anne (2016). "Editorial: The Problems and Prospects of Trafficking Prosecutions: Ending impunity and securing justice". Anti-Trafficking Review (6): 1–11. Retrieved 3 June 2018. 
  31. ^ Gallagher, Anne T. (2010). The international law of human trafficking. New York: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 9780521191074. 
  32. ^ American Society of International Law. "ASIL Certificate of Merit and Special Book Awards". American Society of International Law. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  33. ^ Gallagher, Anne T.; David, Fiona. (2014). The international law of migrant smuggling. New York: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 9781107015920. 
  34. ^ Ramji-Nogales, Jaya (October 2016). "Book Review - The International Law of Migrant Smuggling". American Journal of International Law. 110 (4): 854–858. 
  35. ^ "Doorstop with Tim Costello, Anne Gallagher and Damian Walshe-Howling". Australian Government. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  36. ^ Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe, Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights. "Expert Group Meeting on Human Rights Protection in the Return of Trafficked Persons". Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  37. ^ Harvard Law School, American Constitution Society. "Career Pathways in International Human Rights with Anne T.Gallagher". Harvard Law School. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  38. ^ National Judicial College of Australia, Twiglight Seminar for the Judiciary. "People Trafficking" (PDF). National Judicial College of Australia. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  39. ^ Gallagher, Anne (5 July 2012). "Turning a blind eye to modern-day slavery no longer an option'". Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  40. ^ Radio National, Law Report. "Slavery in the 21st Century". Radio National. ABC. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  41. ^ Reporter Sally Neighbour, Producer Peter Cronau. "Sex Slavery". Four Corners. ABC. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  42. ^ "Four Dangerous Assumptions about Human Trafficking". World Economic Forum. Retrieved 2 June 2018. 
  43. ^ "Migrant Smugglers are Winning: Here's Why". World Economic Forum. Retrieved 2 June 2018. 
  44. ^ "Without Trafficking, What would Happen to Global Wealth and Productivity?". The Guardian. Retrieved 2 June 2018. 
  45. ^ "The Trafficking Watchlist may be Flawed, but its the Best Measure we Have". The Guardian. Retrieved 2 June 2018. 
  46. ^ "Could Trump be an Ally in the Fight against Human Trafficking?". Open Democracy. Retrieved 2 June 2018. 
  47. ^ "The Global Slavery Index is Based on Flawed Data - Why Does No One Say So?". The Guardian. Retrieved 2 June 2018. 
  48. ^ "Unravelling the Global Slavery Index: Part One". Open Democracy. Retrieved 2 June 2018. 
  49. ^ "Worst Offender Lists Biased towards Rich Countries won't help us Fight Slavery". The Guardian. Retrieved 2 June 2018. 
  50. ^ "Chasing Slave Traders: A Law Enforcement Perspective on Operation Underground Railroad". Huffington Post. Retrieved 2 June 2018. 
  51. ^ "Unravelling the Global Slavery Index: Part Two". Open Democracy. Retrieved 2 June 2018. 
  52. ^ The Spectator
  53. ^ "The Race for the UN's Top Job". The Spectator. Retrieved 2 June 2018. 
  54. ^ "When it Comes to Free Speech, We're all Hypocrites". The Spectator. Retrieved 2 June 2018. 
  55. ^ "Migration Diary". The Spectator. Retrieved 2 June 2018. 
  56. ^ "Australian Diary". The Spectator. Retrieved 2 June 2018. 
  57. ^ United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (2010). Commentary: Recommended Principles and Guidelines on Human Rights and Human Trafficking (PDF). New York and Geneva: United Nations. p. 5. 
  58. ^ Anti-Slavery Australia. "Anti-Slavery Australia Freedom Awards". Anti-Slavery Australia. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  59. ^ O'Conner, Kerrie (4 August 2012). "Honour for Bingi doctor". Bay Post. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  60. ^ Taylor-Kabbaz, Amy (11 June 2012). "Queen's Birthday Honour for human trafficking campaigner". 702 ABC Sydney. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  61. ^ AusAID. "Recognising leadership in combating human trafficking". AusAID. Australian Government. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  62. ^ Williams, Jacqueline (23 June 2012). "Honoured for legal work". The Canberra Times. 
  63. ^ Hall, Eleanor (20 June 2012). "Australian recognized for fighting human trafficking". The World Today, ABC News. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  64. ^ "ICMS appoints new President and Governing Committee". ICMC. Retrieved 2 June 2018. 
  65. ^ International Catholic Migration Commission
  66. ^ ICMC. "Interview: Dr. Anne Gallagher on Confronting the Globalization of Indifference". ICMC. Retrieved 4 June 2018.