Anthoceros agrestis

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Anthoceros agrestis
Anthoceros agrestis 060910a.jpg
Anthoceros agrestis in Schwäbisch-Fränkische Waldberge, Deutschland.
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Anthocerotophyta
Class: Anthocerotopsida
Order: Anthocerotales
Family: Anthocerotaceae
Genus: Anthoceros
Species: A. agrestis
Binomial name
Anthoceros agrestis
(Paton) Damsholt
Synonyms[1][2][3]
  • Anthoceros multifidus auct. non. L.
  • Anthoceros nagasakiensis Steph.
  • Anthoceros punctatus auct. non L.
  • Anthoceros punctatus L. var. cavernosus (Nees) Gottsche Lindenb. & Nees
  • Aspiromitus agrestis (Paton) Schljakov
  • Aspiromitus cavernosus (Nees) Schljakov
  • Aspiromitus punctatus (L.) Schljakov var. agrestis (Paton) R.M. Schust.
  • A. crispulus non (Mont.) Douin
  • Anthoceros constans Lindb.
  • Anthoceros husnotii Steph.
  • Anthoceros longicapsulus Steph.
  • Anthoceros multilobulus Lindb.
  • Anthoceros punctatus var. cavernosus (Nees) Gottsche Lindenb. & Nees
  • Aspiromitus punctatus agrestis agrestis (Paton) R. M. Schust.

Anthoceros agrestis, commonly called field hornwort,[4] is a bryophyte of the Anthoceros genus. It has complicated taxonomies.

Taxonomy[edit]

A specimen of Anthoceros agrestis in Schwäbisch-Fränkische Waldberge, Deutschland.

This species of Anthoceros is known for having enzymes like cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase (EC 1.14.13.11), a cytochrome P450-dependent hydroxylase. Cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase (C4H; EC 1.14.13.11) is one of the first known plant cytochrome P450 monooxygenases[5] and also one of the best-characterized cytochrome P450 hydroxylases from higher plants.[6][7]

Chemistry[edit]

Production of rosmarinic acid and a rosmarinic acid 3'-O-beta-D-glucoside in suspension cultures of this hornwort was also discovered in 2005.[8]

Anthocerodiazonin, an alkaloid, was isolated from in vitro cultures of the species. Also, six glutamic acid amides, N-(4-hydroxybenzoyl)-glutamic acid, N-(3,4-dihydroxybenzoyl)-glutamic acid, N-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoyl)-glutamic acid, (E)-N-(isoferuloyl)-glutamic acid, (Z)-N-(isoferuloyl)-glutamic acid and (Z)-N-(p-coumaroyl)-glutamic acid were obtained as natural products.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ USDA-Plants profile for Anthoceros agrestis http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=ANAGA2
  2. ^ http://luirig.altervista.org/schedenam/fnam.php?taxon=Anthoceros+agrestis+var.+agrestis
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2012-08-26. Retrieved 2010-12-27. 
  4. ^ Edwards, Sean R. (2012). English Names for British Bryophytes. British Bryological Society Special Volume. 5 (4 ed.). Wootton, Northampton: British Bryological Society. ISBN 978-0-9561310-2-7. ISSN 0268-8034. 
  5. ^ Russell and Conn 1967, Russell 1971
  6. ^ Werck-Reichhardt 1995
  7. ^ Petersen, M. (18 January 2003). "Cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase from cell cultures of the hornwort Anthoceros agrestis". Planta. 217 (1): 96–101. doi:10.1007/s00425-002-0960-9. PMID 12721853. Retrieved 14 November 2002. 
  8. ^ Vogelsang, K.; Schneider B.; Petersen M. (20 August 2005). "Production of rosmarinic acid and a new rosmarinic acid 3'-O-beta-D-glucoside in suspension cultures of the hornwort Anthoceros agrestis Paton.". Planta. 223 (2): 369–73. doi:10.1007/s00425-005-0089-8. PMID 16133208. 
  9. ^ Becker, H.; Burkharda G.; Trennheuser F. (3 February 1994). "Anthocerodiazonin an alkaloid from Anthoceros agrestis". Phytochemistry. 37 (3): 899–903. doi:10.1016/S0031-9422(00)90380-7.