Anthony Eaton

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Anthony Eaton
Born 1972 (age 44–45)
Papua New Guinea
Occupation Writer
Nationality Australian
Period 2000-present
Genre Children's, Fantasy, history, Young adult
Notable awards Aurealis Award
Best young-adult novel
2007 Skyfall
Website
www.anthonyeaton.com

Anthony Eaton is an Australian writer of fantasy and young adult fiction.

Biography[edit]

Eaton was born in Papua New Guinea in 1972 and moved to Perth, Western Australia during his childhood. After attending university he worked as a literature and drama teacher at Trinity College, Perth for eight years. He currently lives in Canberra and is a lecturer at the University of Canberra.[1] In 2000 Eaton's first novel was released in Australia, entitled The Darkness. It won the 2001 Western Australian Premier's award for Young Adult Literature and was a short-list nominee for the 2000 Aurealis Award for best fantasy novel.[1][2] He then released two more books in 2001 and in 2003. In 2004 Eaton released Fireshadow, which won the Western Australian Premier’s award for Young Adult Literature and was named as an honour book in the CBCA Book of the Year Awards.[1] In 2005 he started his Darklands Trilogy with the first book, Nightpeople, being a short-list nominee for the 2005 Aurealis Award for best fantasy novel and best young-adult novel.[3] In 2007 the second book in the trilogy, Skyfall won the 2007 Aurealis Award for best young-adult novel and in 2008 Into White Silence was named an honour book in the 2009 CBCA Book of the Year awards and was a short-list nominee for the Queensland Premier's Literary Awards.[1][4] Eaton is currently teaching Creative Writing at the University of Canberra whilst he works on his next set of novels.

Bibliography[edit]

Novels[edit]

The Darklands Trilogy

Children's fiction[edit]

Nathan Nuttboard Trilogy

Other children's fiction
  • The Girl In The Cave (2005)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "About Anthony". anthonyeaton.com. Retrieved 2010-02-03. 
  2. ^ "The Locus Index to SF Awards: 2001 Aurealis Awards". Locus Online. Archived from the original on 14 January 2010. Retrieved 2010-02-03. 
  3. ^ "The Locus Index to SF Awards: 2006 Aurealis Awards". Locus Online. Archived from the original on 14 January 2010. Retrieved 2010-02-03. 
  4. ^ "The Locus Index to SF Awards: 2008 Aurealis Awards". Locus Online. Archived from the original on 11 February 2010. Retrieved 2010-02-03. 

External links[edit]