Anthropic Bias (book)

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Anthropic Bias: Observation Selection Effects in Science and Philosophy
Author Nick Bostrom
Language English
Subject Anthropic principle
Publisher Routledge
Publication date
2002
Media type Print
Pages 240
ISBN 978-0415883948
Followed by Human Enhancement

Anthropic Bias: Observation Selection Effects in Science and Philosophy (2002) is a book by philosopher Nick Bostrom. Bostrom investigates how to reason when suspected that evidence is biased by "observation selection effects", in other words, evidence that has been filtered by the precondition that there be some appropriate positioned observer to "have" the evidence. This conundrum is sometimes hinted at as "the anthropic principle," "self-locating belief," or "indexical information".[1][2] Discussed concepts include the self-sampling assumption and the self-indication assumption.

Reviews[edit]

A review from Virginia Commonwealth University said the book "deserves a place on the shelf" of those interested in these subjects.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Anthropic Bias | anthropic-principle.com". www.anthropic-principle.com. Retrieved 2015-11-03. 
  2. ^ "Anthropic Bias: Observation Selection Effects in Science and Philosophy (Hardback) - Routledge". www.routledge.com. Retrieved 2015-11-03. 
  3. ^ Manson, Neil (2003-02-09). "Anthropic Bias: Observation Selection Effects in Science and Philosophy". University of Notre Dame. Retrieved 2015-11-21. 

External links[edit]