Arch Whitehouse

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Arthur George Joseph "Arch" Whitehouse
Born11 December 1895
England
DiedNovember 1979
United States
AllegianceEngland England
Service/branchBritish Army
Royal Flying Corps
Royal Air Force
Years of service1915-1919
Rank2nd Lt.
UnitNo. 22 Squadron RAF
Battles/warsFirst World War
AwardsMilitary Medal
British War Medal
British Victory Medal
Other workAuthor, writer, Historian, novelist

Arthur George Joseph "Arch" Whitehouse , M.M. was a World War I Veteran and author of World War I aviation books.

Biography[edit]

Arthur George J. Whitehouse was born in England, but lived in Montvale, New Jersey, U.S.A. At the outbreak of World War I, Whitehouse came to England and enlisted as a Private with the Northamptonshire Yeomanry # 1784. He then transferred to the Royal Flying Corps # 78563. With the Northamptonshire Yeomanry again # 145871. He then transferred to the Royal Air Force # 401090 [1]

Service[edit]

He was a 1st Class Air mechanic and Observer with the No. 22 Squadron RAF. On 13 April 1917 Whitehouse and his Pilot Bush were brought down by anti-aircraft fire; Whitehouse believed afterward that the Red Baron mistakenly listed Whitehouse/Bush among the Barons's "credits"-although this was not so.[2] For taking part in shooting down German Aircraft and airplane raiding missions he was awarded the Military Medal with the RFC in November 1917.[3] During the last part of World War I he was undergoing training in England as a Pilot in Sopwith Camels aircraft. As of 28 September 1919 he was a 2nd Lt transferred to the Unemployed List.[4] A notation on his Medal card noted he was awarded the "British War Medal" and British "Victory Medal" [5]
Contrary to reports that he brought down 16 enemy aircraft and 6 balloons,[6] it should be noted that Whitehouse was never an ace, although he took part in the shooting down of four enemy aircraft:[7]

Both Bush and Meggit were Aces with 6 credits

Author[edit]

"Arch" Whitehouse was a writer postwar for magazines such as Flying Aces (magazine) on World War I Aviation, creating characters like The Griffon, Coffin Kirk, and others.

In the 1960s, he wrote a wide range of books, both fiction and non-fiction on aviation and similar military topics.

More recently, some of his pulp fiction have been reprinted by several publishers, including Altus Press.

Books[edit]

  • The Adventures of Coffin Kirk (2013)
  • Amphibious Operations (1963)
  • Combat in the Sky
  • The Complete Adventures of the Griffon (3 volumes so far, 2010-2016)
  • Decisive Air Battles of the First World War
  • Espionage and Counterespionage: Adventures in Military Intelligence (1964)
  • Fighters in the Sky (1959)
  • Fighting Wings: aerial combat in world war (1966)
  • Fighting Ships
  • Hero without Honor
  • Heroes and Legends of World War I
  • Heroes of the Sunlit Sky (1967)
  • Hun Killer:Frank Luke, the Ace from Arizona (1966)
  • Legion of the Lafayette (1962)
  • Playboy Squadron {Fiction}
  • Scarlett Streamers
  • Squadron 44 (1965, fiction)
  • Squadron Shilling (1968, fiction)
  • Squadrons of the Sea: The History of Aircraft Carrier Operations (1962)
  • Subs and Submariners
  • Tank:The Story of Their Battles and the Men Who Drove Them from Their First Use (1960)
  • The Casket Crew
  • The Early Birds the Wonders and Heroics of the First Decades of Flight (1965)
  • The Fledgling: An Autobiography (1964)
  • The Military Airplane
  • The Military Airplane Its History and Development
  • The Real Book about Airplanes (1961)
  • The Sky's the Limit: a History of US Airlines (1971)
  • The Years of the Sky Kings (1964)
  • The Zeppelin Fighters (1966)
  • Wings for the Chariots
  • Years of the Warbirds

References[edit]