Atomic Dog (film)

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Atomic Dog
GenreHorror
Science Fiction
Thriller
Written byMiguel Tejada-Flores
Directed byBrian Trenchard-Smith
StarringDaniel Hugh Kelly
Isabella Hofmann
Cindy Pickett
Micah Gardener
Theme music composerPeter Bernstein
Country of originUnited States
Original language(s)English
Production
Producer(s)Ted Bauman
Mark H. Ovitz
CinematographyDavid Lewis
Editor(s)Stephen R. Myers
Running time95 min.
Production company(s)Wilshire Court Productions
DistributorUSA Network
Release
Original networkUSA Network
Original release
  • January 14, 1998 (1998-01-14)

Atomic Dog is a 1998 sci-fi horror film directed by Brian Trenchard-Smith and starring Daniel Hugh Kelly and Cindy Pickett. The story tells of a dog who, after being exposed to radiation, begins the search to identify himself with a pack.

Plot[edit]

A man befriends a male puppy of about three months old that lives in an nuclear plant. One day, an accident causes the people working in the plant to abandon him. However, the man has no chance of retrieving the puppy, who has to stay inside.

A few years later, a family moves into the town along with their female dog. Somehow the puppy, now an atomic dog, with an enhanced sense of smell, strength and memory only given to wolves, manages to escape from the plant and mates with the female dog, producing a litter of puppies. However, upon delivering, the female dog perishes, and is buried in the backyard.

The family gives most of the puppies away, but keep two of them. However, the dog himself tries to retrieve them, and launches himself on an attack towards those humans he sees as threatening, starting with the local veterinarian. The family itself becomes involved, and the dog chases them to the plant. Here he leaps toward a young girl who is in danger of being killed by falling metal tubes. The dog is mortally injured by the falling metal tubes and dies while the girl pets him. He is buried beside his consort.

Production[edit]

Trenchard Smith says he got the job directing the film because of his experience handling animals on the Tarzán TV series.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Trenchard-Smith, Brian (11 August 2001). "HOLLYWOOD SURVIVOR". Daily Telegraph.

External links[edit]