Augusta Stowe-Gullen

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Augusta Stowe-Gullen
Augusta Stowe-Gullen.jpg
Born
Ann Augusta Stowe

(1857-07-27)July 27, 1857
DiedSeptember 25, 1943(1943-09-25) (aged 86)
Toronto, Ontario
Occupation

Ann Augusta Stowe-Gullen (July 27, 1857 – September 25, 1943), was a Canadian medical doctor, lecturer and suffragist. She was born in Mount Pleasant, Ontario[1] as the daughter of Emily Howard Stowe and John Fiuscia Michael Heward Stowe. A plaque regarding her work can be found in Brant County, Ontario.[1]

Medical career[edit]

She is best known for being the first woman to graduate from a Canadian medical school (Faculty of Medicine at Victoria College, Cobourg[1]) in 1883. This made Emily and Augusta the first mother-daughter medical team in Canada.[1] Her appeal to Dr. Barrett and other medical people led to the establishment of the Ontario Medical College for Women.

She also had a notable career teaching medical topics at the Ontario Medical College for Women. She was a member of the Ontario College of Physicians and Surgeons, a founder of the National Council of Women and a member of the Senate of the University of Toronto among important roles she carried out during her lifetime. In 1935 she was awarded the Order of the British Empire.

Activism[edit]

She was elected a trustee on the Toronto Board of Education in 1892, serving until 1896. Toronto allowed women to run for the Board of Education long before Ontario allowed this elsewhere.

Stowe-Gullen also helped her mother establish what would later be called Women's College Hospital.

A leading figure in the suffrage movement, she succeeded her mother as president of the Dominion Women's Enfranchisement Association in 1903.

She is known for her quotation "When women have a voice in national and international affairs, wars will cease forever."

She died at her home in Toronto on September 25, 1943.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Dr. Augusta Stowe Gullen 1857-1943". Ontarioplaques.com. Alan L. Brown. Retrieved April 5, 2019.
  2. ^ "Death Takes Dr. Gullen". Windsor Star. Toronto. September 27, 1943. p. 2. Retrieved July 16, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.

External links[edit]