Baldwin Hamey the Elder

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Baldwin Hamey the Elder, M.D., also Baudouin Hamey (1568–1640) was a Flemish physician who settled in London.

Life[edit]

Hamey was born at Bruges, and studied at the University of Leyden, where he graduated M.D. in 1592. He was nominated by Johannes Heurnius for a post under Feodor II of Russia, who had asked the Rector of Leiden for a physician. He held the position from 1594 to 1597, when he resigned.[1][2] Mark Ridley was another physician in Moscow at the same time: it is thought they both made the mistake of coming without ensuring a legal right to leave.[3]

In 1598 Hamey returned to Holland, and in the same year settled in London. There he had a marginal and unlicensed practice, largely among immigrants, for a dozen years.[2] He was admitted a licentiate of the College of Physicians on 12 January 1610. He then practised with success till his death, of a pestilential fever, 10 November 1640. He was buried on the north side of the church of All Hallows Barking, and his three children erected a monument in the church to his memory. He left money to the College of Physicians.[1]

Hamey was a member of the Dutch Reformed humanist circle around the London church of Simon Ruytinck. He associated in it with Jacob Cool (Ortelianus) and Raphael Thorius. As a physician he was a conservative Galenist.[2] A laudatory biography was written by Richard Palmer.[4]

Family[edit]

Hamey in 1598 married Sara Oeils, in Amsterdam. His niece, Mary Oeils, married George Johnson MP. His eldest son, Baldwin Hamey the younger also became a physician. His second son was a merchant in London, and his daughter married a Mr. Palmer.[1]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c  Stephen, Leslie; Lee, Sidney, eds. (1890). "Hamey, Baldwin (1568-1640)". Dictionary of National Biography. 24. London: Smith, Elder & Co.
  2. ^ a b c Grell, Ole Peter. "Hamey, Baldwin, the elder". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/2039. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  3. ^ Sabine Dumschat (2006). Ausländische Mediziner im Moskauer Russland (in German). Franz Steiner Verlag. p. 263. ISBN 978-3-515-08512-0.
  4. ^ Brian Nance (2001). Turquet de Mayerne as Baroque Physician: The Art of Medical Portraiture. Rodopi. p. 3. ISBN 978-90-420-1131-1.
Attribution

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainStephen, Leslie; Lee, Sidney, eds. (1890). "Hamey, Baldwin (1568-1640)". Dictionary of National Biography. 24. London: Smith, Elder & Co.