Balfour Beatty Construction

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Balfour Beatty Construction US
Public
Industry Construction
Founded 1933
Headquarters Dallas, Texas, United States
Key people
Ray Bond, CEO
Services Construction Management, General Contracting, Cost Consulting, Design-Build, Preconstruction Services, Public-Private Partnerships
Revenue $4.5 Billion (2015)
Number of employees
2,400
Parent Balfour Beatty plc
Website www.balfourbeattyus.com

Balfour Beatty Construction, is a commercial construction company, headquartered in Dallas, Texas, with full service offices in the United States. Balfour Beatty Construction's parent company is Balfour Beatty in London.

History[edit]

Balfour Beatty Construction’s roots date back to 1933,[1] when two regional construction businesses were founded—Frank J. Rooney Construction Company in Miami, Florida, and Eugene Simpson and Company in Washington, DC.

Centex Corporation acquired these, and other regionally-based construction companies through the 1960s and 1970s to form Centex Construction,[2] the commercial building arm of Centex Corporation.

Centex Construction operated through early 2007, when it was acquired[3] by Balfour Beatty, a global leader in engineering and construction. Since then, the United States branch of the construction company has operated as Balfour Beatty Construction.

A brief historical timeline:

  • 1933: Frank J. Rooney Construction Company (now Balfour Beatty Construction's Florida division)[4] and Eugene Simpson & Company (now Balfour Beatty Construction's Washington, D.C. division) are founded.
  • 1936: J.W. Bateson Company (now Balfour Beatty Construction's North Texas division) is founded.[5]
  • 1966: Centex acquires J.W. Bateson.[6]
  • 1971: Completion of the Cinderella Castle and other projects at Disney World, which opens to the public.
  • 1972: Completion of Texas Stadium, former home of the Dallas Cowboys.[7]
  • 1987: Centex purchases the backlog and other assets of Rogers Construction Company in Nashville, Tennessee; the newly formed company is named Centex-Rodgers Construction.[8]
  • 1989: Completion of the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center in Dallas.
  • 1994: Centex Construction is ranked as the second largest general contractor in the U.S. and also the third largest builder of healthcare facilities.[9]
  • 1995: The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, built by J.W. Bateson, is the target of terrorist bomber Timothy McVeigh.[10]
  • 1996: Completion of the NASA Mission Control in Houston, Texas.[11]
  • 2001: The company forms a startup division (Southeast Division) in Charlotte, North Carolina.[12]
  • 2003: Centex Construction is chosen to build the Pentagon Memorial to victims of the 9/11 terrorist attack in Washington, D.C.,[13] the National Museum of the Marine Corps,[14] and the United States Air Force Memorial.[15]
  • 2004: Completion of the two largest contracts to date, the Gaylord Texan Resort Hotel & Convention Center in Grapevine, Texas and the Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center, National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. (Both contracts exceeded $350 million.)
  • 2007: Centex Construction is acquired by Balfour Beatty plc, a U.K.-based international engineering and construction group. The company is re-branded as Balfour Beatty Construction.[16]

Balfour Beatty Construction has embarked on a series of acquisitions including Charter Builders in 2006, R.T. Dooley[17] and SpawMaxwell in 2009,[18] Barnhart and Charter Builders in 2010,[19] and most recently in June 2011, Howard S. Wright.[20]

Operations[edit]

Balfour Beatty Construction offers several services: Construction management, general contracting, cost consulting, design-build, preconstruction services, public-private partnerships, and IDIQ/JOC.[21]

The company has been identified as a Top Ten Green Builder,[22] loss prevention (a safety record that is more than three times better than the industry average)[23] , and employee engagement (named one of Fortune magazine’s 100 Best Companies to Work For in four consecutive years).[24]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About Us" www.balfourbeattyus.com Balfour Beatty Construction website.
  2. ^ "Centex Construction", Funding Universe website.
  3. ^ "Balfour Beatty Buys Centex", The Telegraph, 2007.
  4. ^ "Fort Lauderdale", www.balfourbeattyus.com Balfour Beatty Construction website.
  5. ^ "J. W. Bateson Construction Company", www.emporis.com Emporis website.
  6. ^ "Securities and Exchange Commission Form 10-K" www.getfilings.com website, Page 5, Part 1, Item 1.
  7. ^ "Texas Stadium Implosion",FOX 4 DFW April 12, 2010.
  8. ^ "Centex Rodgers Inc.", www.emporis.com Emporis website.
  9. ^ "Centex Construction", Funding Universe website.
  10. ^ "Timohty McVeigh: Convicted Oklahoma City Bomber",CNN March 29, 2001.
  11. ^ "American's Nerve Center for Mission Operations",NASA.
  12. ^ "Charlotte", www.balfourbeattyus.com Balfour Beatty Construction website.
  13. ^ "Pentagon 9/11 Memorial Honors Victims in Symbols, Concrete",CNN Sept. 11, 2008.
  14. ^ "Proud to Claim the Title of Marine",Fairfax Times Nov. 11, 2006.
  15. ^ "Air Force Memorial Unveiled at Pentagon",NPR Oct. 15, 2006.
  16. ^ "Balfour Beatty Buys Centex", The Telegraph, 2007.
  17. ^ "Balfour Beatty Acquires RT Dooley", Charlotte Business Journal, February 23, 2009.
  18. ^ "Balfour Beatty Expands Texas Operations", ENR Texas, by Debra Wood, July 1, 2010.
  19. ^ "Balfour Beatty Expands Texas Operations", ENR Texas & Louisiana, by Debra Wood, July 1, 2010.
  20. ^ "Howard S. Wright sold", Portland Business Journal, 2011.
  21. ^ "Our Services" www.balfourbeattyus.com Balfour Beatty Construction website.
  22. ^ "Top 100 Green Contractors", Engineering News-Record, 2011.
  23. ^ "Zero Harm Brochure"(PDF)
  24. ^ http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/best-companies/2013/snapshots/85.html?iid=bc_lp_arrow2