Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Taranto

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Archdiocese of Taranto
Archidioecesis Tarentina
Cattedrale di san cataldo.JPG
Taranto Cathedral
Location
Country Italy
Ecclesiastical province Taranto
Statistics
Area 1,056 km2 (408 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2014)
412,500
415,500 (est.) (99.3%)
Parishes 88
Information
Denomination Catholic Church
Rite Roman Rite
Established 6th century
Cathedral Basilica Cattedrale di S. Cataldo
Secular priests 155 (diocesan)
65 (Religious Orders)
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Archbishop Filippo Santoro
Emeritus Bishops Benigno Luigi Papa, O.F.M. Cap.
Map
locator map of diocese of Taranto
Website
www.webdiocesi.chiesacattolica.it

The Archbishopric of Taranto (Latin: Archidioecesis Tarentina) is a metropolitan Roman Catholic diocese in southern Italy, on a bay in the Gulf of Taranto.[1][2]

Its suffragan sees are the diocese of Castellaneta and diocese of Oria. The current Archbishop of Taranto is Archbishop Filippo Santoro, appointed by Pope Benedict XVI on 21 November 2011 to replace Archbishop Benigno Luigi Papa, O.F.M. Cap., whose resignation was accepted that same day.[1]

History[edit]

In a local Tarantine legend, according to a document of the 11th or 12th century,[3] the Gospel was preached in Taranto by St. Peter the Apostle. He had arrived in the city in AD 45, along with Saint Mark, on their way to Rome. Amasianus was a gardner or greengrocer, whom Peter converted to Christianity.[4] It is only later, much later, that the Tarentines claim that Amasianus was consecrated a bishop. It is also stated that St. Cataldus was consecrated by St. Peter the Apostle.[5] Whether Amasianus was the first bishop of Taranto, or whether it was Cataldus, in whose honor the Cathedral is dedicated, seems to be a pointless inquiry. As Lanzoni remarks, the stories are full of fables. The real Cataldus was an Irish bishop from Rachau (or Rachan) of the 6th century, who happened to die in Taranto during his pilgrimage to the Holy Land.[6]

The city also honors the martyr St. Orontius. Interestingly, Orontius, the son of an Imperial treasurer, had been converted to Christianity by Justus, a disciple of St. Paul, who had landed at the port of Saint Cataldus, and preached to the population in the locality of Lecce in the time of Nero, despite harassment by imperial officials. They returned to Corinth, where St. Paul consecrated Orontius the first Bishop of Lecce, and the party returned to Lecce to continue their evangelization.[7]

The first bishop whose date is known is Petrus (not Innocentius) (496).[3] In the pontificate of St. Gregory the Great (590–604), the names of three bishops who filled the episcopal chair are known: Andreas (590), Joannes (601), and Honorius (603). Archbishop Joannes (978) is the first who had the title of archbishop.

It is well known that Taranto even under the Byzantines never adopted the Greek Rite. Stephanus perished in the battle of Nelfi (1041) fought by the Greeks and the Normans; Draco (1071) erected the cathedral; Filippo (1138) was deposed for supporting the antipope Anacletus II, and died in the monastery of Chiaravalle; Archbishop Angelo was employed in several embassies by Innocent III; Jacopo da Atri was slain in 1370; Marino del Giudice (1371) was one of the cardinals condemned by pope Urban VI in 1385.

Cardinal Ludovico Bonito (1406) was one of the few who remained faithful to Gregory XII; Cardinal Giovanni d'Aragona (1478), was son of King Ferdinand of Naples; Giovanni Battista Petrucci suffered for the complicity of his father in the conspiracy of the barons; Cardinal Battista Orsini died in 1503 in the Castle of Sant' Angelo.

Cardinal Marcantonio Colonna (1560) introduced the Tridentine reforms and established the seminary; Girolamo Gambara (1569) was a distinguished nuncio; Lelio Brancaccio (1574) suffered considerable persecution on account of his efforts at reformation; Tommaso Caracciolo (1630), a Theatine, died in the odour of sanctity.

Early 20th century[edit]

The city of Taranto forms a single parish divided into four pittagerii, each of which contains a sub-pittagerio. It includes the Basilian Abbey of S. Maria di Talfano, where there are still some Albanians following the Greek Rite.

Bishops[edit]

Diocese of Taranto[edit]

Erected: 5th Century
Latin Name: Tarentinus

  • Petrus (attested 494)[8]
  • Andreas (attested 593)[9]
  • Joannes[10]
  • Honorius (attested 603)[11]
  • Joannes (attested 649)[12]
  • Gervasius
  • Germanus (attested 680)[13]
  • Caesarius (attested 743)[14]
...

Archdiocese of Taranto[edit]

Elevated: 10th Century
Latin Name: Tarentinus

from 978 to 1400[edit]

  • Joannes (attested 978)[15]
  • Dionysius (983)
  • Alexander Facciapecora
  • Stephanus
  • Draso (Drago) (attested 1071)[16]
  • Ursus
  • Basilius
  • Albertus
  • Jacobus
  • Stephanus Philamarinus
  • Moraldus (Monaldus)
...
  • Gervasius (attested 1187–1193)[17]
  • Angelus (1194 – 1200)[18]
Sede Vacante (by 28 July 1200 – January 1202)[19]
  • Geraldus (attested 1202)[20]
  • Nicolaus (attested 1205)[21]
  • Berardus (attested 1205, 1210, 1211)[22]
  • Ignotus (1215)[23]
  • Gualterus (attested 1216 – March 1218)[24]
  • Nicolaus (10 May 1219 – 20 August 1247)[25]
Sede Vacante (8 August 1249 – 25 March 1252)[26]
  • Henricus de Carasolo (25 March 1252 – 22 July 1274)[27]
[Jacobus de Viterbio was not an archbishop][28]
Sede Vacante (20 October 1274 – 3 December 1275)[29]
  • Henricus de Carasolo, again (12 March 1276 – 20 April 1297)[30]
  • Gualterius (22 June 1299 – 1301)[31]
  • Gregorius, O.P. (1301 – 1334)[32]
  • Rogerius Capitignonas (26 April 1334 – 1348)[33]
  • Bertrand de Castronovo (de Chateauneuf) (1348 - 7 Jan 1349)[34]
  • Jacobus (7 January 1349 – 1378)[35]
  • Martinus (20 November 1381 – 1384)[36] (Avignon Obedience)
  • Matthaeus (28 May 1384 – after 1394)[37] (Avignon Obedience)
  • Marinus del Judice (by 4 June 1380 – c. 1382/1385)[38] (Roman Obedience)
  • Pierre Amelli, O.S.A. (c. 1386 - 12 Nov 1387)[39]
  • Petrus (12 April 1389 – 1391?)[40]
  • Elziarius (27 June 1391 – )
  • Bartolommeo d'Aprano[41] ( – 17 March 1400) (Roman Obedience)

from 1400 to 1600[edit]

from 1600 to 1800[edit]

Sede vacante (1703–1713)
  • Giovanni Battista Stella (30 Aug 1713 - Dec 1725 Died)[58]
  • Giovanni Fabrizio de Capua (22 Dec 1727 - 11 Dec 1730)[59]
  • Celestino Galiano, O.S.B. (30 Apr 1731 Confirmed - 31 Mar 1732 Resigned)[60]
  • Casimiro Rossi (19 Jan 1733 Confirmed - 5 May 1738)[61]
  • Giovanni Rossi, C.R. (21 May 1738 - 20 Feb 1750)[62]
  • Antonino Sersale (16 Nov 1750 - 11 Feb 1754)[63]
  • Isidoro Sánchez de Luna, O.S.B. (22 Apr 1754 - 28 May 1759)[64]
  • Francesco Saverio Mastrilli, C.R. (13 Jul 1759 - Oct 1777)[65]
  • Giuseppe Capecelatro (30 Mar 1778 - 28 Mar 1817 Resigned)[66]

since 1800[edit]

  • Giovanni Antonio de Fulgure, C.M. (25 May 1818 - 6 Jan 1833 Died)
  • Raffaele Blundo (6 Apr 1835 - 20 Jun 1855 Died)
  • Giuseppe Rotondo (Rotundo) (17 Dec 1855 - 20 Jan 1885 Died)
  • Pietro Alfonso Jorio (Iorio)[67] (27 Mar 1885 - 15 Nov 1908 Resigned)
  • Carlo Giuseppe Cecchini, O.P. (4 Dec 1909 - 17 Dec 1916 Died)[68]
  • Orazio Mazzella (14 Apr 1917 - 1 Nov 1934 Resigned)
  • Ferdinando Bernardi (21 Jan 1935 - 18 Nov 1961 Died)
  • Guglielmo Motolese (16 Jan 1962 - 10 Oct 1987 Retired)
  • Salvatore De Giorgi (10 Oct 1987 - 11 May 1990 Resigned)
  • Benigno Luigi Papa, O.F.M. Cap. (11 May 1990 - 21 Nov 2011 Retired)
  • Filippo Santoro[69] (21 Nov 2011 - )

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Archdiocese of Taranto" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  2. ^ "Archdiocese of Taranto" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  3. ^ a b Lanzoni, p. 315.
  4. ^ Societas Bollandi (1899). Bibliotheca hagiographica latina antiquae et media aetatis (in Latin). Vol. I. A-I. Bruxelles: Société des Bollandistes. pp. 250–251, nos. 1652–1653. 
  5. ^ Bibliotheca hagiographica latina antiquæ et mediæ ætatis (in Latin). Vol. II. K-Z. Bruxelles. 1901. pp. 971, no. 6679. 
  6. ^ Lanzoni, p. 316. See: John Lanigan (1829). An ecclesiastical history of Ireland. Vol. III. Dublin: J. Cummings. pp. 123–128. , who provides a rich collection of the scholarly contradictions that embellish the tale of Cataldus.
  7. ^ Lanzoni, pp. 310-311, who points out that the story is very late.
  8. ^ The name "Innocentius" is incorrectly reported, from a letter written by Pope Gelasius I to the Clergy, Leaders, and People of Taranto that he is sending a new bishop, Peter. Jaffé-Loewenfeld, Regesta pontificum Romanorum I, editio altera (Leipzig: Veit 1885), p. 86, no. 647. Lanzoni, p. 316, no. 2.
  9. ^ Pope Gregory issued a decision that Bishop Andreas of Tarentum, if he has a concubine, must resign, and he must refrain from priestly functions for two months because the woman in question had been beaten 'de matriculis'. The Pope also ordered Bishop John of Gallipoli to see to it that Andreas obeyed and to protect the clergy who had been maltreated by Bishop Andreas. Jaffé-Loewenfeld, p. 157 no. 1249, 1250.
  10. ^ The document of Gregory I is a forgery. Jaffé-Loewenfeld, p. 168, no. †1366. Lanzoni, p. 317.
  11. ^ Pope Gregory I allowed Bishop Honorius to put into use the new baptistery which he had built. Jaffé-Loewenfeld, p. 211, no. 1889.
  12. ^ Bishop John was present at the Roman Synod at the Lateran under Pope Martinus I: Ughelli, p. 125-126. J-D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus X (Florence 1764), p. 366.
  13. ^ Bishop Germanus subscribed the decrees of the III Council of Constantinople: J-D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus XI (Florence 1765), p. 773.
  14. ^ Bishop Caesarius was present at the Roman Synod of Pope Zacharias: Ughelli, p. 126. J-D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus XII (Florence 1766), p. 384c, gives the name Aufredus Taranto.
  15. ^ Ughelli, p. 126.
  16. ^ Ughelli, pp. 126-127. Gams, p. 929.
  17. ^ Kamp, pp. 691-692.
  18. ^ Ughelli, pp. 131-136. Kamp, pp. 692-695.
  19. ^ Kamp, p. 695, with notes 37 and 38.
  20. ^ Gerardus: Kamp, p. 696.
  21. ^ Nicolaus: Kamp, p. 696.
  22. ^ Ughelli, p. 136. Kamp, pp. 696-697.
  23. ^ Kamp, p. 697, note 52.
  24. ^ Gams, p. 929. Eubel, I, p. 473. Kamp, p. 697.
  25. ^ Ughelli, p. 137. Kamp, pp. 698-701.
  26. ^ Kamp, p. 702.
  27. ^ Henricus was in exile from 1253 to 1266. Kamp, p. 703-704.
  28. ^ Kamp, p. 705, note 118.
  29. ^ Kamp, p. 705.
  30. ^ Kamp, p. 706.
  31. ^ A native of Naples, Gualterius had previously been Bishop of Anglona. Ughelli, p. 138. Eubel, I, pp. 90, 473.
  32. ^ Gregory was a native of Capua. Ughelli, p. 138. Eubel, I, p. 473.
  33. ^ Rogerius: Ughelli, pp. 138-139. Eubel, I, p. 473.
  34. ^ Bishop-elect Bertrand was appointed Archbishop of Salerno on 7 January 1349 by Pope Clement VI, and then Archbishop of Embrun (8 January 1364). He was named Bishop of Viviers on 5 September 1365. He died in 1374. Eubel, I, pp. 234, 430, 473, 533.
  35. ^ Jacobus had been titular Bishop of Corinth (Greece) (c. 1340–1349). Eubel, I, pp. 210, 473.
  36. ^ Martinus had been Bishop of Sora (1364–1378). He was appointed Bishop of Tricarico (1378–1381) by Pope Gregory XI. He was appointed Archbishop of Taranto by Clement VII. Eubel, I, p. 473, 497.
  37. ^ Matteo had been Bishop of Trani (1379–1384). He was appointed Archbishop of Taranto by Clement VII. He was still in office under Benedict XIII. Eubel, I, pp. 473, 492.
  38. ^ A native of Amalfi, Marinus had been Archbishop of Brindisi. He was Chamberlain of Urban VI. He was promoted to the cardinalate by Urban VI somewhere between 1382 and 1385. He was executed by Urban VI in December 1386. Ughelli, pp. 139-140. Eubel, I, pp. 24 no. 32; 149; 473.
  39. ^ Petrus had been Bishop of Senigallia (1375–c.1386). He was appointed Patriarch of Grado by Urban VI on 12 November 1387. Eubel, I, pp. 266, 447, 473.
  40. ^ Petrus had previously been Bishop of Otranto (1382–1389). Ughelli, pp. 140-141. Eubel, I, pp. 280, 473.
  41. ^ Bartolommeo was transferred to the diocese of Salerno. He died on 4 September 1414. Ughelli, p. 141. Eubel, I, pp. 430, 473.
  42. ^ A native of Teramo in the Abruzzi, Archbishop Giacomo was transferred to the diocese of Florence on 16 November 1401. He was transferred to Spoleto on 18 July 1410, and died there in 1417. Ughelli, p. 141. Eubel, I, pp. 251, 463, 473.
  43. ^ Adimari had been Archbishop of Florence (1400–1401). He was appointed Archbishop of Pisa on 3 November 1406, and named a cardinal by Pope John XXIII on 6 June 1411. Eubel, I, pp. 32 no. 3; 400; 473.
  44. ^ Ludovico was previously Bishop of Palermo (1387–1392, expelled), titular bishop of Antivari in Epirus (1395), titular Archbishop of Thessaloniki (Macedonia) (1395–1399), Bishop of Bergamo (1399–1400), and Bishop of Pisa (1400–1407). He was named a cardinal by Gregory XII on 19 September 1408. When Gregory XII was deposed by the Council of Pisa, Bonitus was deposed as well by Pope John XXIII. He died on 18 September 1413. Eubel, I, pp. 31, no. 5; 93, 396, 400, 473.
  45. ^ Brancaccio was appointed Administrator by Pope John XXIII, and, according to Ughelli, held the post for nine years. He died in October 1427. Ughelli, p. 142. Eubel, I, pp. 25, 473.
  46. ^ Berardi was a Neapolitan, of the family of the Counts of Tagliacozzi. He was appointed Cardinal-Priest on 18 December 1439 by Pope Eugenius IV, and assigned the titular church of Santi Nereo e Achilleo. He served as Nuncio in Germany to 1440. Ughelli, p. 142. Eubel, I, p. 473; II, pp. 7, no. 5; 26 no. 5.
  47. ^ On March 1, 1442 Cesarini was named Apostolic Legate in Poland, Bohemia, Austria, and Hungary. He departed the Curia, which was still residing in Florence, on 14 March: Eubel, II, p. 27 no. 29. He was appointed Cardinal-Bishop of Frascati on 6 March 1443. E. Celani, in: Archivio della R. Società romana di storia patria (in Italian). Rome: Nella sede della Società alla biblioteca Vallicelliana. 1892. pp. 238–241.  He died in Hungary on 10 November 1444, in the battle of Varna.
  48. ^ Orsini the brother of Giacomo Orsini, Duke of Gravina. He was Papal Nuncio in England in 1451. He was made Archdeacon of Wiltshire in the Church of Salisbury on 8 November 1452. William Henry Rich Jones (1879). Fasti Ecclesiæ Sarisberiensis: Or, A Calendar of the Bishops, Deans, Archdeacons, and Members of the Cathedral Body at Salisbury, from the Earliest Times to the Present. London-Salisbury: Brown. p. 173.  Margaret M. Harvey (1993). England, Rome, and the Papacy, 1417-1464: The Study of a Relationship. Manchester University Press. pp. 96, 115–116. ISBN 978-0-7190-3459-6.  On 8 July 1452 he was named Abbot Commendatory of S. Nicolò fuori del castello di Mentana, and of S. Maria and di S. Vito of Monte Gentile. Eubel, I, p. 473.
  49. ^ a b c d e f g h i Eubel, Konrad (1923). Hierarchia catholica medii et recentioris aevi. Vol. III (second ed.). Münster: Libreria Regensbergiana. p. 308.  (in Latin)
  50. ^ a b c Gauchat, Patritius (Patrice) (1935). Hierarchia catholica medii et recentioris aevi. Vol. IV. p. 327. 
  51. ^ A native of Naples, Frangipani had been Bishop of Caiazzo (1572–1592), and then Bishop of Tricarico (1592–1605). He was Nuncio in Cologne from 1587–1596, and then Nuncio in the Spanish Netherlands (Flanders) from 1596 to 1606. He was nominated Archbishop of Taranto by King Philip II of Spain. He died on 24 July 1612. Ughelli, pp. 147-148. Eubel, III, p. 145. Gauchat, p. 127; 327, with note 3; p. 343, with note 3.
  52. ^ Caetani: Gauchat, p. 343, with note 4.
  53. ^ D'Aquino: Gauchat, p. 343, with note 5.
  54. ^ "Archbishop Francisco Sánchez Villanueva y Vega" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved October 7, 2016.[self-published source?] Gauchat, p. 343, with note 6.
  55. ^ Carrillo was created a cardinal by Pope Urban VIII on 30 August 1627, on the nomination of King Philip IV of Spain. Ughelli notes that he did not reside in his diocese. He died in Rome on 19 December 1649. Ughelli, p. 148. Gauchat, p. 21 no. 21; p. 343, with note 7.
  56. ^ "Archbishop Tommaso Caracciolo, C.R." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved August 8, 2016.[self-published source?] He was a member of the family of the Princes of Avellino. The family produced nine bishops in the Kingdom of Naples in the 17th century. Gérard Labrot (1999). Sisyphes chrétiens: la longue patience des évêques bâtisseurs du Royaume de Naples, 1590-1760 (in French). Seyssel: Editions Champ Vallon. pp. 14, note 1. ISBN 978-2-87673-283-4. 
  57. ^ Pignatelli was born in Senise (diocese of Anglona) in 1652. He taught philosophy and theology in houses of the Theatine Order. He was nominated Archbishop of Taranto by the King of Spain on 7 March 1683, and received papal approval on 13 April 1683. He was consecrated in Rome by Cardinal Carlo Pio on 3 October 1683. He was named Nuncio to Poland on 20 March 1700. On 19 February 1703 he was transferred to the diocese of Naples. Pignatelli was created a cardinal on 17 December 1703, by Pope Clement XI and assigned the titular church of Santi Marcellino e Pietro al Laterano. He was a candidate for the papacy in the Conclave of 1721, but his candidacy was vetoed by the King of Spain. He died on 5 December 1734. Ritzler, V, pp. 24 no.1; 283, with note 5; 368, with note 3.
  58. ^ Stella was born in a country district called Modugno (Bari) in 1660, and was a Doctor in Civil and Canon Law (Naples, 1683). He was consecrated bishop in Rome by Cardinal Fabrizio Paolucci on 3 September 1713. He died in December 1725. Ritzler, V, p. 368, with note 4.
  59. ^ Fabrizio was nominated by the Emperor, as King of Naples, on 21 June 1727, and approved by the Pope on 22 December. He was consecrated in Rome by Pope Benedict XIII on 27 December 1727. He was transferred to the diocese of Salerno on 11 December 1730. He died in March 1738. Ritzler, V, p. 368, with note 5.
  60. ^ Galiano was born in S. Giovanni Rotondo (Siponto) in 1681. He joined the Celestine Congregation of the Benedictine Order, and taught theology in the houses of his Order; he also taught history at the Sapienza in Rome. He became an Abbot, then Procurator General, and finally Abbot General of the Congregation. He was nominated to the diocese of Taranto by the Emperor on 31 March 1731, and approved by Pope Clement XII on 30 April. He was consecrated a bishop in Rome by Cardinal Antonio Zondadari on 27 May 1731. He resigned on 31 March 1732 and was named titular bishop of Thessaloniki (Greece); he became Major Chaplain to King Charles VII of Naples. He died on 26 July 1753. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VI, p. 392 with note 2; p. 404.
  61. ^ Casimiro Rossi was born in Naples in 1685, and was a Master of theology (Naples, 1722). The Emperor, as King of Naples, nominated him on 4 September 1732; he was approved on 19 January 1733 by Pope Clement XII, and consecrated in Rome by Cardinal Troiano d'Acquaviva on 25 January 1733. Rossi was transferred to Salerno on 5 May 1738. He died in Naples on 27 December 1758. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, pp. 363 with note 3; 393 with note 3. De Marco (1988), pp. 27-43.
  62. ^ Giovanni Rossi was born in Capo di Monte (Naples) in 1688. He lectured in philosophy and canon law for his Order, of which he was twice Procurator General. He was a Qualificator of the Holy Office (Inquisition). He was named Bishop of Ugento (1736–1737), and was consecrated a bishop in Rome by Cardinal Antonio Zondadari on 22 April 1736. He was transferred to the post of Archishop of Acerenza and Matera (1737–1738), and then to Taranto on 21 May 1738. He died on 20 February 1750. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, pp. 64, with note 3; 393 with note 4; 424, with note 2. De Marco (1988), pp. 43-65, 106, 114.
  63. ^ Sersale was born in Sorrento in 1702, the son of the Signore of Capua. He studied at the University of Naples, obtaining the doctorate in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law) in 1743. He was named a Canon of the Cathedral of Naples by Cardinale Giuseppe Spinelli (1741). At the suggestion of Cardinal Spinelli, King Carlos III named Sersale to the diocese of Brindisi on 27 August 1743; the appointment was approved by Pope Benedict XIV on 9 September 1743; he was consecrated in Naples by Cardinal Spinelli on 29 September 1743. Sersale was nominated to the See of Taranto by King Carlos III on 24 September 1750, and approved by Benedict XIV on 16 November 1750. He was transferred to the See of Naples on 11 February 1754 in succession to Cardinal Spinelli, who had been named Bishop of Palestrina and Protector of the Kingdom of Naples before the Holy See. Sersale was named a cardinal by Benedict XIV on 22 April 1754. He died on 24 June 1775. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, pp. 17 no. 54; 132, with note 2; 393 with note 5.
  64. ^ Sanchez was born in Naples in 1705. He entered the Congregation of Cassino in the Benedictine Order in 1720, and became a priest in 1728. He became a lecturer in theology in his Congregation in 1735, and then public lecturer in the University of Naples. On 2 April 1748 he was nominated Bishop of Ariano by the King of Naples, and was consecrated in Rome on 12 May by Cardinal Ioachim Ferdinand Portocarrero. He was transferred to the archdiocese of Taranto on 22 April 1754, on the nomination of the King of Naples made on 7 March. Sanchez was transferred to the archdiocese of Salerno on the nomination of the King of Naples (24 February 1759), in succession to Casimiro Rossi, on 28 May 1759. He resigned on 13 March 1783, and was appointed the titular Archbishop of Tarsus; he died in 1788. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 99 with note 2; 363 with note 4; 393 with note 6; 394 with note 7.
  65. ^ Mastrilli was born in Tufino (Nola) in 1699. He was a lecturer in Scripture in the houses of his Order, a master of novices, twice Provost of the house of the Holy Apostles in Naples. He was nominated archbishop of Taranto by the King of Naples on 3 July 1759, and consecrated in Rome on 15 July by Henry Stuart, Cardinal York. He died in October 1777. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 393 with note 7. De Marco (1988), pp. 83-86, 92-95, 108, 113-114.
  66. ^ Capecelatro was born in Naples in 1744, and was Doctor in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law) from the Sapienza in Rome (1773). He was a Canon of the Cathedral of Naples. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 393 with note 8. De Marco (1988), Chapter IV, pp. 109-185. Alfonso Pepe (2010). Giuseppe Capecelatro. L'uomo di due secoli (in Italian). Naples: Alfredo Guida. ISBN 978-88-6042-712-0. 
  67. ^ Giuseppe Blandamura (1949). Mons. Pietro Alfonso Jorio, arcivescovo di Taranto (1885-1908): in occasione della traslazione dei resti mortali da Papani a Taranto (in Italian). Taranto: Tipografia arcivescovile. 
  68. ^ Cecchini was born in Bagni di Lucca in 1853. He was Rector and Administrator of the Basilica of the B.V.M. de Pompeii. He was then Archpriest-Prelate of Altamura and Aquaviva delle Fonti (1904–1909), and titular Bishop of Halicarnassos (Turkey). On the resignation of Archbishop Jorio, Cecchini was named Apostolic Administrator of the diocese of Taranto. Mélanges de l'Ecole française de Rome: Italie et Méditerranée (in French). Rome: L'Ecole française de Rome. 2005. pp. 700 note 14. ISBN 978-2-7283-0744-9. 
  69. ^ On 18 September 2012, Archbishop Santoro was named by Pope Benedict XVI to serve as one of the papally-appointed Synod Fathers for the October 2012 13th Ordinary General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops on the New Evangelization: http://www.microsofttranslator.com/BV.aspx?ref=IE8Activity&a=http%3A%2F%2Fpress.catholica.va%2Fnews_services%2Fbulletin%2Fnews%2F29687.php%3Findex%3D29687%26po_date%3D18.09.2012%26lang%3Den[dead link]

Books[edit]

Reference Works[edit]

Studies[edit]

Acknowledgment[edit]

See also[edit]

Coordinates: 40°25′05″N 17°14′27″E / 40.4181°N 17.2408°E / 40.4181; 17.2408