Bob Manning (pop singer)

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Bob Manning (February 1, 1926 – October 23, 1997) was an American big band singer who was popular in the 1950s, and well-known through his radio and television appearances.[1][2]

Early years[edit]

Manning was born Manny Levin in 1926.

Manning first gained notice as Ziggy Elman's vocalist after first touring with local bands and singing on local radio stations.[3] He recorded for MGM Records with Elman and also with Art Mooney[4] and Tommy Dorsey.[3]

Radio[edit]

Manning was a featured singer on Rhythm on the Road, an hour-long weekly program on CBS in 1955.[5]

Television[edit]

In May 1954, Manning was a guest singer on Dave Garroway's television program.[6]

Recording[edit]

Manning had hits as a soloist after signing to Capitol Records[3]

Personal life and death[edit]

Manning's stepson is actor and voice artist Barry Gordon.[3]

Manning died of pneumonia on October 23, 1997, aged 71.

Albums[edit]

  • Lonely Spell (1955, Capitol)
  • Our Wedding Songs (1958, Everest)
  • Tommy Alexander Presents His Golden Trombones (1958, Everest; Manning on four tracks)

Hit singles[edit]

Year Single US Chart position label catalog #
1953 "The Nearness of You" 16[7] Capitol 2383 [8]
"All I Desire" 27[7] Capitol 2493[8]
1954 "Venus De Milo" 29[7] Capitol 2694

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Bob Manning; Singer With Big Bands". La Times. 28 October 1997. Retrieved 9 June 2015. 
  2. ^ "Bob Manning". Family Search. Retrieved 9 June 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c d ‹See Tfm› Vera, Billy (2000). From the Vaults Vol. 4: Love Letters (CD). Hollywood: Capitol Records. p. 7. 
  4. ^ Herman, Pinky (December 16, 1952). "Television--Radio". Motion Picture Daily. p. 4. Retrieved 27 January 2016. 
  5. ^ Sies, Luther F. (2014). Encyclopedia of American Radio, 1920-1960, 2nd Edition, Volume 1. McFarland & Company, Inc. ISBN 978-0-7864-5149-4. P. 553.
  6. ^ "(TV listing)". New York, Brooklyn. The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. May 14, 1954. p. 16. Retrieved January 25, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  7. ^ a b c Pop Memories 1890-1954. Joel Whitburn. 1986. Record Research Inc. p. 293. ISBN 0-89820-083-0
  8. ^ a b Abrams, Steven and Settlemier, Tyrone Capitol 2000 - 2500, numerical listing discography Online Discographical Project. November 1, 2011. Retrieved December 7, 2011.

External links[edit]