Bredbo

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Bredbo
New South Wales
Bredbo Pub, New South Wales.jpg
Bredbo Inn
Bredbo is located in New South Wales
Bredbo
Bredbo
Coordinates35°57′0″S 149°09′0″E / 35.95000°S 149.15000°E / -35.95000; 149.15000Coordinates: 35°57′0″S 149°09′0″E / 35.95000°S 149.15000°E / -35.95000; 149.15000
Population352 (2016 census)[1]
Postcode(s)2626
Location
LGA(s)Snowy Monaro Regional Council
State electorate(s)Monaro
Federal Division(s)Eden-Monaro
Localities around Bredbo:
ACT Colinton Jerangle
Shannons Flat Bredbo Jerangle
Billilingra Billilingra Peak View

Bredbo is a village on the Monaro plains of New South Wales, Australia.[2][3] The village is on the Monaro Highway 34 kilometres (21 mi) north of Cooma. The village is in the Snowy Monaro Regional Council and had a population of 352 at the 2016 census.[1]

History[edit]

Located at the junction of the Bredbo and Murrumbidgee rivers, the Bredbo area was historically prone to flooding. As a way-point on the road from Sydney to the Snowy Mountains, travellers were frequently stranded by rising water. By 1839 the Bredbo Inn had been established to accommodate travellers. The Inn was a Cobb and Co stagecoach post, with stables located behind the Inn which are still standing today.

The surrounding settlement was developed to support squatters' runs established in the district between 1848 and 1850. Bredbo was officially proclaimed a village in 1888.

Gold was discovered in the area by the Reverend William Branwhite Clarke, who also discovered gold at Kiandra. [1] A field was proclaimed along the Bredbo River, which was worked until 1921. In the 1930s a geological survey was undertaken and a mine opened and operated until 1942. The field at Cowra Creek were worked from 1888 and are still popular for fossicking.

Bombala Railway in Bredbo

Bredbo sits on the Bombala railway line which reached the town in 1889 at which time there were eight houses. The railway closed in 1989 however one final "Farewell to Bredbo" special train was run from Canberra on 3 March 1990.

In the early 20th century, the Australian poet Banjo Paterson stayed at the Bredbo Inn. It is here that Paterson may have encountered the notable stockman Charlie McKeahnie, a likely source of inspiration for Paterson's epic poem The Man From Snowy River. McKeahnie was renowned for his risky riding, and was eventually killed in a horse race over the Bredbo bridge. Following the accident the fatally wounded McKeahnie was carried to the Inn, where he died of his injuries.

One of the earliest settlers in the Bredbo district, John Cosgrove of Billilingera, was believed to be the largest landholder in southern New South Wales. In one year 68,000 sheep were shorn in the Billilingera shearing shed.

Heritage listings[edit]

Bredbo has a number of heritage-listed sites, including:

Village life[edit]

Bredbo's community is supported by an active Progress Committee and through a number of activities on the local events calendar.[citation needed] New residents to the village are presented with a Bredbo Welcome Pack, which contains information about the region's history, a copy of the monthly newsletter and useful contact numbers.

Bredbo is well located for access to the service town of Cooma and all the resources of Canberra. It is an easy drive from Bredbo to the ski resorts of Perisher Blue, Thredbo and Mt Selwyn. Locals receive discounts at some of these resorts. There are also extensive mountain bike trails and events in the Thredbo area.

The village hosts a number of small businesses and eateries, including the historic Bredbo Inn, which offers contemporary bistro fare, accommodation and free camping; the green-and-white-striped Pancake Inn, serving pancakes and crepes; Snowy Mountains Gourmet Food, providing daily pies and regional produce; and the Bredbo Pizzeria, where wood-fired pizzas are served.

Art and craft is a growing feature of the community,[citation needed] with a number of creative artists resident in the area. These include the children's label Milli and Max; artist Lucy Culliton; and Canberra-region design collective, The Lost and Found Office. Locally made goods are available in a number of the village shops. Other retailers in the village include the Bredbo Christmas Barn and the Bredbo Aromatic Healing Centre.

A Community Post Office is located in the Snowy Mountains Gourmet Food store. While there is no postal delivery directly to homes in the village, the store is open from 8am to 4pm, 7 days per week.

Internet and phone infrastructure is managed by Telstra. Whilst a high speed fibre optic cable runs through Bredbo, access to cabled internet is limited due to the restricted availability of ports at the local exchange. Various wifi and satellite connections are available through several ISPs, pending connection of the village to the National Broadband Network.

Primary school aged children are catered for through the Bredbo Public School. The School is a wonderful small school where students receive personal attention and individualized learning, leadership opportunities, a close, safe family culture and numerous interesting other activities. The school is also used as a polling place in state and federal elections. Daily coaches transport high school students directly into Canberra and Cooma.

Bredbo also has a community hall, tennis and basketball courts, village green, cemetery, war memorial and recreation ground. Public toilets are located immediately behind the community hall. The Cooma-Monaro library offers a mobile library service.

Religious services are offered through St Bartholomew's Anglican Church, which is located high on a hill with views overlooking the town. The historic wooden All Saints Catholic Church is located on Walker Street.

Bredbo village is located close to the junction of the Bredbo River and Murrumbidgee River, with several fishing and swimming spots located within walking distance of the village hall.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Australian Bureau of Statistics (27 June 2017). "Bredbo (State Suburb)". 2016 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 7 July 2017. Edit this at Wikidata
  2. ^ "Bredbo". Geographical Names Register (GNR) of NSW. Geographical Names Board of New South Wales. Retrieved 16 August 2017.
  3. ^ "Bredbo". OpenStreetMap. Retrieved 16 August 2017.
  4. ^ "Bredbo Rail Bridge Group". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H01029. Retrieved 18 May 2018.

External links[edit]