Sue Hecht

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from C. Sue Hecht)
Jump to: navigation, search
Sue Hecht
Sue Hecht (2008).jpg
Maryland House of Delegates
In office
1995–2003
Constituency District 3A, Frederick County
Maryland House of Delegates
In office
2007–2011
Constituency District 3A, Frederick County
Personal details
Born (1947-12-07) December 7, 1947 (age 70)
Takoma Park, Maryland
Political party Democratic
Residence Frederick, Maryland
Occupation Professor, Writer, Non-profit Manager

Sue Hecht (born 1947) is an American politician from Maryland and a member of the Democratic Party. She retired in 2011 after serving three terms in the Maryland House of Delegates, representing Maryland's District 3A in Frederick County. She is known for her campaign slogan "Hecht Yes!".

Hecht was born in Takoma Park, Maryland on December 7, 1947. She attended Frederick Community College, Hood College, and Frostburg State University, where she earned her MBA before becoming an adjunct professor at Frostburg State University, a freelance writer, and executive director of a non-profit organization. Hecht has received numerous awards for her work, including being included in a list of Maryland's top 100 women.

Election results[edit]

  • 2006 Race for Maryland House of Delegates – District 3A[1]
Voters to choose two:
Name Votes Percent Outcome
Galen R. Clagett, Dem. 12,422   25.7%    Won
Sue Hecht, Dem. 13,900   28.7%    Won
Patrick N. Hogan, Rep. 12,163   25.1%    Lost
Linda Naylor, Rep. 9,873   20.4%    Lost
Other Write-Ins 32   0.1%    Lost
  • 2002 Race for Maryland State Senate – District 3[2]
Name Votes Percent Outcome
Alex X. Mooney, Rep. 21,617   55.0%    Won
C. Sue Hecht, Dem. 17,654   44.9%    Lost
Other Write-Ins 66   0.2%    Lost
  • 1998 election for Maryland House of Delegates – District 3[3]
Voters to choose three:
Name Votes Percent Outcome
Louise Virginia Snodgrass, Rep. 19,196   21%    Won
C. Sue Hecht, Dem. 17,968   19%    Won
Joseph R. Bartlett, Rep. 15,784   17%    Won
William M. Castle, Rep. 15,251   17%    Lost
Richard L. Stup, Dem. 13,191   14%    Lost
David P. Koontz, Dem. 10,858   12%    Lost
  • 1994 election for Maryland House of Delegates – District 3[4]
Voters to choose three:
Name Votes Percent Outcome
J. Anita Stup, Rep. 20,262   25%    Won
Louise Virginia Snodgrass, Rep. 14,071   17%    Won
C. Sue Hecht, Dem. 12,700   15%    Won
Ronald L. Sundergill, Dem. 12,466   15%    Lost
Melvin L. Castle, Rep. 12,227   15%    Lost
Royd Smith, Dem. 10,810   13%    Lost

Legislative Notes[edit]

  • voted for the Maryland Gang Prosecution Act of 2007 (HB713), subjecting gang members to up to 20 years in prison and/or a fine of up to $100,000[5]
  • voted for Jessica’s Law (HB 930), eliminating parole for the most violent child sexual predators and creating a mandatory minimum sentence of 25 years in state prison, 2007[6]
  • voted for Public Safety – Statewide DNA Database System – Crimes of Violence and Burglary – Post conviction (HB 370), helping to give police officers and prosecutors greater resources to solve crimes and eliminating a backlog of 24,000 unanalyzed DNA samples, leading to 192 arrests, 2008[7]
  • voted for Vehicle Laws – Repeated Drunk and Drugged Driving Offenses – Suspension of License (HB 293), strengthening Maryland’s drunk driving laws by imposing a mandatory one year license suspension for a person convicted of drunk driving more than once in five years, 2009[8]
  • voted for HB 102, creating the House Emergency Medical Services System Workgroup, leading to Maryland’s budgeting of $52 million to fund three new Medevac helicopters to replace the State’s aging fleet, 2009[9]

For the past four years, Delegate Hecht has annually voted to support classroom teachers, public schools, police and hospitals in Frederick County. Since 2002, funding to schools across the State has increased 82%, resulting in Maryland being ranked top in the nation for K-12 education.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "House of Delegates Results". Maryland State Board of Elections.  Retrieved on Nov. 21, 2007
  2. ^ "State Senate Results". Maryland State Board of Elections.  Retrieved on Oct. 8, 2007
  3. ^ "House of Delegates Results". Maryland State Board of Elections. Retrieved June 15, 2008. 
  4. ^ "House of Delegates Results". Maryland State Board of Elections. Retrieved June 15, 2008. 
  5. ^ http://mlis.state.md.us/2007rs/billfile/hb0713.htm
  6. ^ http://mlis.state.md.us/2007RS/billfile/hb0930.htm
  7. ^ http://mlis.state.md.us/2008rs/billfile/hb0370.htm
  8. ^ http://mlis.state.md.us/2009rs/billfile/hb0293.htm
  9. ^ http://mlis.state.md.us/2009rs/billfile/hb0102.htm

References[edit]