Callaghan Innovation

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Callaghan Innovation
Callaghan Innovation logo.png
Crown entity overview
Formed 1 February 2013 (2013-02-01)
Preceding Crown entity
Jurisdiction Government of New Zealand
Headquarters Gracefield, Lower Hutt, New Zealand
Motto Making your ideas happen
Minister responsible
Crown entity executives
  • Vic Crone, Chief Executive
  • Pete Hodgson, Chair
Key document
Website www.callaghaninnovation.govt.nz

Callaghan Innovation, a Crown entity[2] of New Zealand,[3] has the task of making New Zealand business more innovative. It was established in February 2013 and Industrial Research Limited, a Crown Research Institute, was merged into it. The institute takes its name from Sir Paul Callaghan, a prominent New Zealand physicist who died in 2012.

Mary Quin became the first CEO, in May 2013,[4] and resigned in July 2016. Victoria Crone started as CEO on 28 February 2017.

On 6 January 2014 the departments of carbohydrate chemistry[5] and high temperature superconductors[6] were ceded to Victoria University of Wellington, being renamed the Ferrier and Robinson Research Institutes respectively.[7] This resulted in a transfer of 55 staff.

Notable staff[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ministerial Portfolio: Research, Science and Innovation". Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. Retrieved 18 May 2018. 
  2. ^ "Callaghan Innovation Act 2012". New Zealand Legislation. Parliamentary Counsel Office Te Tari Tohutohu Paremata. Retrieved 2016-11-24. Callaghan Innovation is Crown entity 
  3. ^ "About Us". Callaghan Innovation. Callaghan Innovation. Retrieved 2014-03-05. Callaghan Innovation is a stand-alone Crown Entity established on 1 February 2013. Our role hasn’t previously existed in New Zealand. 
  4. ^ Sachtleben, Amanda (14 March 2013). "Callaghan Innovation appoints CEO". Fairfax. Retrieved 1 August 2013. 
  5. ^ "Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology: Carbohydrate Chemistry Group 2010". Archived from the original on June 5, 2010. 
  6. ^ "High temperature superconductors 2010". Archived from the original on June 5, 2010. 
  7. ^ "New institutes link Callaghan Innovation to Victoria University". Callaghan Innovation. 17 Dec 2013. Retrieved 13 May 2014. 

External links[edit]