Carol Black

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For the British academic and expert on work and health, see Carol M. Black.
Carol Black
Born Takoma Park, MD
Alma mater Swarthmore College
Occupation Writer and filmmaker
Years active 1983–present
Spouse(s) Neal Marlens
Children 2
Website carolblack.org

Carol Black is an American writer and filmmaker. She is best known as the creator and writer-producer of the television series The Wonder Years and Ellen, both with her husband and partner Neal Marlens. Black and Marlens received the 1988 Emmy Award for Outstanding Comedy Series for The Wonder Years and the 1989 Writer’s Guild of America award after only six episodes had aired.[1][2][3]

Black studied education and literature at Swarthmore College and UCLA, and after the birth of her children, left her career in the entertainment industry to become involved in the unschooling and alternative education movement and later to make independent nonprofit films.[4]

In 2010 she directed the documentary film Schooling the World: The White Man’s Last Burden about the impacts of institutional schooling on small-scale land-based societies. Schooling the World premiered at the Vancouver International Film Festival,[4] and features Wade Davis, Helena Norberg-Hodge, Vandana Shiva, Manish Jain, and Dolma Tsering. She also co-directed with Neal Marlens the 2005 mockumentary The Lost People of Mountain Village, about excessive real estate development in the Rocky Mountains, which premiered at Mountainfilm in Telluride.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Museum of Broadcast Communications - Encyclopedia of Television". Retrieved April 16, 2016. 
  2. ^ Haithman, Diane (November 30, 1988). "Success Turns Into Mixed Blessing for Creators of 'Wonder Years'". LA Times. Retrieved 2016-04-16. 
  3. ^ "Carol Black". Internet Movie Database. 
  4. ^ a b "Q and A: Carol Black". Toronto Globe and Mail. October 10, 2010. Retrieved April 16, 2016. 
  5. ^ "Filmmakers mock luxury of vacancy in Telluride 'burb". The Denver Post. March 1, 2006. Retrieved April 16, 2016. 

External links[edit]