Caroline Sinavaiana-Gabbard

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Caroline Sinavaiana-Gabbard is a Samoan writer and Associate Professor of Pacific literature at the University of Hawaii.[1]

Biography[edit]

Sinavaiana-Gabbard was born in Utulei village, Tutuila, Samoa and now lives in the Manoa Valley in Honolulu.[2]

Career[edit]

Sinavaiana-Gabbard's critically acclaimed poetry and scholarship have appeared in national and international journals and her book of poetry - Alchemies of Distance - was published in 2002. The text weaves between prose and verse and communicates a search for a Samoan identity and path of development within a modern colonized world. In his review of Alchemies of Distance, Craig Santos Perez asserts that this text "transforms the distances of time, culture, memory, and migration into a poetry of witness"[3] New Zealand-based Samoan writer and poet Albert Wendt describes Sinavaiana-Gabbard's voice as "a new blend of Samoan, American, and widely ranging poetic and philosophical languages. A unique, vibrant, undeniable voice which shapes the now fearlessly with profound understanding and forgiveness".[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Margaret Mead Was Wrong - Page 2". 3ammagazine.com. Retrieved 9 June 2016. 
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on September 9, 2009. Retrieved January 5, 2010. 
  3. ^ "RATTLE e-Review: ALCHEMIES OF DISTANCE by Caroline Sinavaiana-Gabbard". Rattle.com. Retrieved 9 June 2016. 
  4. ^ Caroline Sinavaiana-Gabbard, “Introduction: a kind of genealogy”, Alchemies of Distance, (Suva: Institute of Pacific Studies, 2001), back cover.
  5. ^ Caroline Sinavaiana-Gabbard, “Introduction: a kind of genealogy”, Alchemies of Distance, (Suva: Institute of Pacific Studies, 2001), p.11.