Carolyn Baxter

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Carolyn Baxter (born 1953)[1] is an African-American poet, playwright, and musician.[2][3][4] Baxter is from Harlem, New York. She was a participant in the Black Panthers School Breakfast Program. Baxter was formerly incarcerated at the New York City Correctional Institute for Women at Rikers Island.[5] Her writings are considered a part of the Prison Art's Movement of the 1960s and 1970s.[6][7]

Education[edit]

Baxter attended Bart College after her incarceration.[8]

Publications[edit]

Books[edit]

  • Prison Solitary and Other Free Government Services (Greenfield Review Press, 1979)

Anthologies[edit]

  • 20th Century Prison Writings (Penguin/Putnam, 1998)[9]
  • The Light from Another Country (Greenfield Review Press, 1984),
  • Wall Tappings Vol 1 (Feminist Press, 1986)[10]
  • Wall Tappings Vol 2 (Feminist Press, 2005)

Career[edit]

Baxter worked for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People NAACP and was a member of the Black Panthers Party. She also worked for the New York City Board of Education in programs for ex-offenders and adolescent offenders.[10] Baxter is a member of the United Federation for Teachers. She played the conga and bass.[citation needed]

Imprisonment[edit]

Baxter was formerly incarcerated at the New York City Correctional Institute for Women at Rikers Island.[5] There, she joined the Free Space Writing Project. Her writings are considered a part of the Prison Art's Movement of the 1960s and 1970s.[6][7] Baxter served time with the singer/poet Marilyn Buck.[11] One of her most famous poems is about masturbating silently on her cot so as not to alert the guards of what she was doing.[12]

Writings[edit]

Brown University did an exhibit titled, Poetry in the Time of Mass Incarceration, which displayed Baxter's writings in the John Hay Library's Willis Reading Room at Brown from September 2015 – January 4, 2016.[13] Her work has been used in studies of the prison industrial complex.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Franklin, Howard Bruce (1998). Prison Writing in 20th-century America. Penguin. ISBN 9780140273052.
  2. ^ "Carolyn Baxter". Brown University.
  3. ^ "Carolyn Baxter". Poets & Writers. Retrieved 2018-08-04.
  4. ^ Bernstein, Lee (2010). America is the Prison: Arts and Politics in Prison in the 1970s. Univ of North Carolina Press. ISBN 9780807833872.
  5. ^ a b "Department of English". www.english.upenn.edu. Retrieved 2018-08-04.
  6. ^ a b Collins, Lisa Gail; Crawford, Margo Natalie (2006-05-16). New Thoughts on the Black Arts Movement. Rutgers University Press. ISBN 9780813541075.
  7. ^ a b Bernstein, L (2006-01-01), Prison writers and the Black Arts Movement, pp. 297–316, retrieved 2018-08-04
  8. ^ Franklin, H. Bruce (2008). "The Inside Stories of the Global American Prison". Texas Studies in Literature and Language. 50 (3): 235–242. doi:10.1353/tsl.0.0008. JSTOR 40755510.
  9. ^ Franklin, Howard Bruce (1998). Prison Writing in 20th-century America. Penguin. ISBN 9780140273052.
  10. ^ a b Scheffler, Judith A. (2002). Wall Tappings: An International Anthology of Women's Prison Writings, 200 to the Present. Feminist Press at CUNY. ISBN 9781558612730.
  11. ^ "Wild Poppies: A Tribute to Marilyn Buck" (PDF). News from the Freedom Archives.
  12. ^ "Speak, O Prison". www.mantlethought.org. Retrieved 2018-08-04.
  13. ^ "About | Poetry from the Age of Mass Incarceration". library.brown.edu. Retrieved 2018-08-04.
  14. ^ "The Effect of Prison Crowding on Behavior" (PDF). National Institute of Justice.