Carrelame

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Carrelame
Carrelame Structure.svg
Names
IUPAC name
(Z)-N-{[(3,5-Dichlorophenyl)amino][(diphenylmethyl)amino]methylene}glycine
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
UNII
  • InChI=1S/C22H19Cl2N3O2/c23-17-11-18(24)13-19(12-17)26-22(25-14-20(28)29)27-21(15-7-3-1-4-8-15)16-9-5-2-6-10-16/h1-13,21H,14H2,(H,28,29)(H2,25,26,27)
    Key: QMIBAVZANYVPEF-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • InChI=1/C22H19Cl2N3O2/c23-17-11-18(24)13-19(12-17)26-22(25-14-20(28)29)27-21(15-7-3-1-4-8-15)16-9-5-2-6-10-16/h1-13,21H,14H2,(H,28,29)(H2,25,26,27)
    Key: QMIBAVZANYVPEF-UHFFFAOYAI
  • c1ccc(cc1)C(c2ccccc2)N/C(=N/CC(=O)O)/Nc3cc(cc(c3)Cl)Cl
Properties
C22H19Cl2N3O2
Molar mass 428.311
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Carrelame is an extremely high potency artificial sweetener of the guanidine class, closely related to lugduname. While Carrelame is roughly 200,000x as sweet as sucrose, lugduname is still somewhat sweeter.[1] It appears safe in pigs.[2]

See also[edit]

Additional reading[edit]

  • O'Brien-Nabors, Lyn (19 April 2016). Alternative Sweeteners. ISBN 9781439846155. Retrieved 13 April 2020.
  • "Low-calorie Sweeteners - Google Books". google.com. Retrieved 13 April 2020.
  • "Optimising Sweet Taste in Foods - Google Books". google.com. Retrieved 13 April 2020.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Glaser D (2002), "Specialization and phyletic trends of sweetness reception in animals" (PDF), Pure Appl. Chem., 74 (7): 1153–1158, doi:10.1351/pac200274071153, S2CID 97439028
  2. ^ Nofre, C; Glaser, D; Tinti, JM; Wanner, M (2002). "Gustatory responses of pigs to sixty compounds tasting sweet to humans". Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition. 86 (3–4): 90–96. doi:10.1046/j.1439-0396.2002.00361.x. PMID 11972677.