Carriage Works, Bristol

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Carriage Works
104 Stokes Croft, Bristol (geograph 3787227).jpg
The Carriage Works in 2012
Carriage Works, Bristol is located in Bristol
Carriage Works, Bristol
Location within Bristol
General information
Town or city Bristol
Country England
Coordinates 51°27′50″N 2°35′22″W / 51.4640°N 2.5894°W / 51.4640; -2.5894Coordinates: 51°27′50″N 2°35′22″W / 51.4640°N 2.5894°W / 51.4640; -2.5894
Completed 1862
Design and construction
Architect Edward William Godwin

The Carriage Works (grid reference ST591740) are in Stokes Croft, Bristol, England.

It was built in 1862 by Edward William Godwin from Pennant stone with Bath stone dressings. It has round arched arcades above double width segmental arches.[1] The ground-floor arches were originally open for access by John Perry and Sons' carriages.[2] In 1844 Thomas and John Perry paid £3 per year to rent the site. By the beginning of the 20th century Perry's had modernised from horse carriages to include the manufacture of cars at the site. From 1913 until 1960s the building was used to process rubber by the Anderson’s Bristol Rubber Co. Ltd.[3] In the 1960 it was home to Regional Pools Promotions a membership scheme which gave prizes and raised money for charity, and later moved next door to Westmoreland House.[4][5]

The building has been designated by English Heritage as a grade II* listed building.[6] The building, which is an example of the Bristol Byzantine style, is on the English Heritage Buildings at Risk Register and described as being in very bad condition.[7]

In September 2011 the Carriageworks Action Group was launched to develop community ideas for the future of the building, the neighbouring Westmoreland House and the land behind. The Action Group is made up of local residents, organisations and businesses, supported by Bristol City Council, and proposes to write a 'community vision' for the site.

In June 2013 a housing association, Knightstone Housing, was named as the preferred developer.[8] In 2015 a planning application was made to Bristol City Council by Fifth Capital to develop the site for a mixed use scheme including 112 homes and designed by Assael Architecture. [9] This was approved in October 2015 despite concerns about the lack of affordable housing included in the scheme.[10][11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Foyle, Andrew (2004). Bristol (Pevsner Architectural Guides: City Guides). Yale University Press. p. 31. ISBN 978-0300104424. 
  2. ^ "The Carriage Works". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 8 August 2016. 
  3. ^ "Old Carriage Works". Bristol Opening Doors. Retrieved 8 August 2016. 
  4. ^ "Stories of Westmorland House: An oral and visual history". Carriageworks. Retrieved 8 August 2016. 
  5. ^ Lowbridge, Caroline. "Bristol's Stokes Croft: Battle over 'home' of Banksy". BBC. Retrieved 8 August 2016. 
  6. ^ "No.104 The Carriage Works". Images of England. Archived from the original on 2007-10-07. Retrieved 2007-05-02. 
  7. ^ "Carriage Works, 104, Stokes Croft, Bristol - Bristol, City of (UA)". Heritage at Risk. Historic England. Retrieved 8 August 2016. 
  8. ^ Vicki Mathias (11 June 2013). "Preferred developer named for Bristol's Carriageworks". This is Bristol. Retrieved 12 June 2013. 
  9. ^ "Landmark regeneration scheme in Bristol". Assael. Retrieved 8 August 2016. 
  10. ^ Onions, Ian (14 October 2015). "Plan for Carriageworks' site in Stokes Croft gets the go ahead". Bristol Post. Retrieved 8 August 2016. 
  11. ^ "Bristol's Stokes Croft buildings redevelopment plan approved". BBC. Retrieved 8 August 2016. 

See also[edit]

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