Cassander (brother of Antipater)

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Cassander (Greek: Κάσσανδρος) was a Greek Macedonian nobleman who lived in the 4th century BC.

Cassander was the son of Iolaus by an unnamed mother and brother of the powerful Regent and general Antipater.[1] Cassander’s family were distant collateral relatives to the Argead dynasty.[2] Cassander, like Antipater, was originally from the Macedonian city of Paliura[3] and was a contemporary to Aristotle.[4]

Little is known on his life. He married an unnamed Greek Macedonian noblewoman by whom he had a child: a daughter called Antigone[5] who married a Greek Macedonian nobleman called Magas[6] by whom she had a daughter called Berenice I of Egypt.[7] His namesake was his nephew Cassander, who became king of Macedon.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Theocritus (17.61)
  2. ^ Ptolemaic Dynasty - Affiliated Lines: The Antipatrids Archived July 16, 2011, at the Wayback Machine.
  3. ^ Heckel, Who’s who in the age of Alexander the Great: prosopography of Alexander’s empire, p.35
  4. ^ Rose, A new general biographical dictionary, Volume 2, Antipater article
  5. ^ Ptolemaic Genealogy: Berenice I, Footnote 3 Archived October 5, 2011, at the Wayback Machine.
  6. ^ Heckel, Who’s who in the age of Alexander the Great: prosopography of Alexander’s empire, p.71
  7. ^ Heckel, Who’s who in the age of Alexander the Great: prosopography of Alexander’s empire, p.71

Sources[edit]