Charles Johnstone

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Charles Johnstone (c. 1719–1800) was an Irish novelist. Prevented by deafness from practising at the Irish Bar, he went to India, where he was proprietor of a newspaper. He wrote one successful book, Chrysal, or the Adventures of a Guinea, a somewhat sombre satire.

Life[edit]

Born at Carrigogunnel, County Limerick about 1719, he was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, but is not known to have taken a degree. He was called to the bar, but extreme deafness prevented his practice except as a chamber lawyer, where he did not succeed. He began to write as a living.[1]

In May 1782 Johnstone sailed for India, with a dangerous shipwreck on the voyage. He found employment in writing for the Bengal newspaper press, under the signature of "Oneiropolos". He became in time joint proprietor of a journal, and prospered. He died at Calcutta about 1800.[1]

Works[edit]

Johnstone's major work, entitled Chrysal, or the Adventures of a Guinea, and frequently reprinted, appeared in 4 vols., London, 1760–5. The first and second volumes had been written during a visit to George Edgcumbe, 3rd Baron Edgcumbe in Devon. The book, a succès de scandale, claimed to reveal political secrets, and to expose the profligacy of well-known public characters.[1]

Johnstone was also the author of:[1]

  • The Reverie, or a Flight to the Paradise of Fools, 2 vols. London, 1762.
  • The History of Arbases, Prince of Betlis, 2 vols. 1774.
  • The Pilgrim, or a Picture of Life, 2 vols. 1775.
  • History of John Juniper, Esq., alias Juniper Jack, 3 vols. 1781.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d  Lee, Sidney, ed. (1892). "Johnstone, Charles". Dictionary of National Biography. 30. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 
Attribution

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainLee, Sidney, ed. (1892). "Johnstone, Charles". Dictionary of National Biography. 30. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 

External links[edit]