Charles Kupchella

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Charles E. Kupchella was the 10th president of the University of North Dakota (UND) in Grand Forks, North Dakota. He began his presidency in 1999 and retired in 2008, and was succeeded by Robert Kelley effective July 1, 2008.[1]

Major issues during Kupchella's presidency included the $100 million gift to UND by benefactor Ralph Engelstad and the subsequent construction of the Ralph Engelstad Arena, controversy over the name and logo of the North Dakota Fighting Sioux athletic teams, and a burgeoning student body that jumped by several thousand during his presidency.

Kupchella is a native of Nanty Glo, Pennsylvania. In 1964, he graduated from Indiana University of Pennsylvania with a B.S.Ed. and a Pennsylvania biology teaching certification. He then studied at St. Bonaventure University where he was awarded a 1968 Ph.D. in physiology.[2] He was a consultant for the North Central Association prior to its dissolution, and has served as a reviewer for a number of other organizations, such as the American Cancer Society, the National Institutes of Health, and the National Science Foundation. He is currently professor emeritus at the University of North Dakota.[3]

He lives in Pennsylvania with his wife Adele, a cancer survivor. They have three children: Richard "Rick", Michele, and Jason. Rick Kupchella was a weekend anchor at the NBC television affiliate, KARE-11, in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "UND's 11th President: Dr. Robert Kelley". UND: Office of University Relations. February 7, 2008. Archived from the original on March 15, 2008. Retrieved 2008-03-02.
  2. ^ "Curriculum Vitae". UND: Office of the President. Archived from the original on 2008-02-22. Retrieved 2008-03-02.
  3. ^ "Academic Search, Inc. | Professionals | Charles E. Kupchella". www.academic-search.com. Archived from the original on 2013-07-10. Retrieved 2015-12-29.

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Kendall Baker
President of the University of North Dakota
1999–2008
Succeeded by
Robert Kelley