Charlie Fink (producer)

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Charlie Fink
Fink 2 small.jpg
Occupation Writer, Producer, Futurist
Years active 1983–present

Charlie Fink is a former Disney, AOL and American Greetings Interactive executive who writes about VR, AR and new media for Forbes.[1] While at Disney, he originated "The Lion King".[2][3] In the 90s, Fink was EVP & COO of VR pioneer Virtual World Entertainment.[4] He is the author of "Charlie Fink's Metaverse, An AR Enhanced Guide to VR & AR".[5] Fink is a speaker at SXSW,[6] AWE,[7] ARiA,[8] and VRTO.[9] Fink is the contributing editor of VR Voice,[10] and a regular contributor to HuffPost,[11] Virtual Realty Pop,[12] and VR Scout.[13]

Career[edit]

Fink started his career in the Animation Division of Walt Disney Pictures, where he rose to the position of Vice-President. In his six years with Disney, Mr. Fink developed and produced live-action and animated motion pictures, including Beauty and The Beast, Aladdin, and The Lion King, which was based on his idea, "Bambi in Africa".[2][14] In 1992, Fink left Disney Pictures to become Executive Vice-President, Chief Operating Officer and Director of Virtual World Entertainment, a software developer and location-based Entertainment Company owned by Tim Disney.[15] That company was later sold to Microsoft.[16][17]

In early 1996, Fink joined AOL as Senior Vice-President and Chief Cr. Officer of its Greenhouse Networks, where he created and launched some of the formative Internet's largest content brands, including Love@AOL (sold to Match.com), Electra (sold to Oxygen Media), Entertainment Asylum, and Santa's Home Page (which he also co-produced with the late Brandon Tartikoff and Will Vinton as an ABC TV special).[18][19][20][21][22]

After leaving AOL in 1999, Fink founded eAgents.com, a daily email service that provided targeted news and entertainment to over five million Internet users each day. In September 2000, less than eight months after founding the company, with its initial product still in beta, eAgents was sold to American Greetings Interactive (AGI).[23] Fink served as President of AGI until 2003, and Chairman until 2005. During his tenure, AG acquired its two largest competitors, BlueMountain.com and eGreetings.com, and transitioned from a free site to a fee based subscription service with over five million paying subscribers.[24]

In 2005, Fink founded and operated digital marketing agency, Charlie Company, specializing in integrated lifestyle marketing campaigns for global brands, startups, and non-profits leveraging SEM, SEO, social, content creation, viral, guerilla and experiential channels; clients included Sprint, eBay, Phoenix Education, Capital One, Moveon.org and others; Created & Produced YouTube series The Two McCains, 2008; Created "The Other 98%" for Moveon.org in 2009, which today has over 6 M followers on Facebook; Developed and executed go-to-market strategy for Erodr, a venture backed geo social app for college campuses, driving 300,000 trials, 2012 - 2014.[25]

Fink earned his BA Degree from Sarah Lawrence College and a Master of Fine Arts Degree from the Art Institute of Chicago.[26]

Theatrical career[edit]

Charlie Fink is the founder and artistic director of the New Musical Foundation, which produces readings, workshops, and festival productions of new musicals.[27] He was Chairman of the Board[28] of New York Musical Theatre Festival (NYMF),[28] from 2007 - 2017.[28] He was honored at the 2017 NYMF gala[28] alongside playwright Marsha Norman for his ten years of leadership. He was previously honored in 2014 by No Rules Theater Company.[29][27] Fink produced Who's Your Baghdaddy? at the Actor's Temple in New York City in 2015. The show nominated Best Musical by the Off-Broadway Alliance.[30] The New York Times called the production "a cunning, rock-solid musical comedy with a terrible title".[31] The show, its title shortened to Baghdaddy, was revived for a subsequent, limited run at St. Luke's Theater in New York City in March, 2017. It played 46 performances and closed on July 2nd, 2017.[32] Cast member Brandon Espinoza won the Chita Rivera Award for "Best Male Dancer in an off-Broadway Show" for his performance in Baghdaddy.[33][34]

Film credits[edit]

  • 1983 Door to Door, 75 mins (writer/director/producer) 16mm Feature, Best First Feature, Houston Film Festival[26]
  • 1984 Savage Beliefs, 90 mins (writer/director/producer) 16mm Feature[35]
  • 1985 One More Saturday Night (assistant director), Columbia Pictures[36]
  • 1986 Nothing in Common (assistant to producer), Tri-Star Pictures[37]
  • 1993 BattleTech & Red Planet Theme park productions (Producer) Starring Judge Reinhold, Joan Severance, Cheech Marin and Nora Dunn[38][39]
  • 1995 BattleTech animated TV series, Saban Ent., (co-executive producer)[40]
  • 1997 The Online Adventures of Ozzie the Elf (executive producer) AOL/ABC TV/Will Winton Studions[41]
  • 2008 The Two McCains, animated online series (producer)[42]
  • 2010 How to Fold a Flag, documentary feature (producer)[43]

1986–1992 Vice President, Walt Disney Pictures, supervised development and/or production of the following projects:

  • Oliver & Co. (1986) Animated Feature
  • The Little Mermaid (1988) Animated Feature
  • The Rescuers Down Under (1990) Animated Feature
  • Beauty and the Beast (1991) Animated Feature
  • Aladdin (1992) Animated Feature
  • Lion King (1993) Animated Feature
  • Fantasia 2000 (2000) Animated Feature
  • The Ducktales Movie (1989) Animated Feature
  • Cranium Command (1988) Theme Park Production
  • Back to Neverland (1990) Theme Park Production
  • Michael and Mickey (1987) Television Production
  • Mickey & Donald at the Oscars (1987) Television
  • Mickey’s Prince and the Pauper (1988) Television
  • Homeward Bound, The Incredible Journey (1992) Live action feature
  • Dinosaur (2002) Live Action Feature
  • The BiCentennial Man (1994) Live Action Feature

Theatrical credits[edit]

  • 2004: The Sandstorm, by Sean Huze (production), Metrostage, DC (non musical)[44][45]
  • 2005: Burn Rate by Paul Scott Goodman (reading) BMI Workshop, NYC[46]
  • 2006: Treasure Island by Brett Smock and Corinne Aquilina (production) GIVA, Rochester [47]
  • 2006: Powerhouse by Shawn Northrip (festival production)[48][49]
  • 2007: Drift by Jeremy Schonfeld and Craig Pospisil (reading) NYC[50]
  • 2007: The Wonderful World of Zidney by Shawn Northrip & Mike Pettry (reading) Metrostage, VA
  • 2008: Curveball by JT Allen and Chris Jefferies (reading) Signature Theater, DC
  • 2008: Joe, by Dan Lipton and Dave Rossemer (reading) Signature Theater, DC[51]
  • 2009: Rooms by Paul Scott Goodman (production) MetroStage, DC, GIVA, NYC[52]
  • 2009: Dot Comet by Michael Ogborn and Craig Pospisil (reading) Woolly Mammoth. DC
  • 2009: Dizzy Miss Lizzie's Roadside Revue presents The Orestia by Deb Bounaccorsi and Steve McWilliams (production) Keegan Theater. Washington, DC[53]
  • 2009: Titus X by Shawn Northrip (festival production) DC Fringe[54]
  • 2009: Dizzie Miss Lizzie's The Saints (festival production) DC Fringe[55]
  • 2009: Hedwig and the Angry Inch Halloween Spooktacular (with No Rules Theater Company), Warehouse Theater, Washington, DC
  • 2010: Little Dead Riding Hood (reading), by Shawn Northrip & James Tucker (reading)
  • 2010: Super Claudio Bros. by Marshall Pailet and Drew Fornorola (festival production) DC Fringe, Best Musical, extended run, acquired by DreamWorks for development for Broadway[56][57][58]
  • 2010: Dizzy Miss Lizzie's Finn McCool (festival production) DC Fringe[59][60]
  • 2011: Who's Your Baghdaddy by Marshall Pailet & A.D. Penedo (festival production) DC Fringe, Best Show, extended run, Broadway World Award Best Actor for Matthew Myers [61][62]
  • 2011: F@#king Up Everything by Eric Davis & Sam Forman (festival production) DC Fringe, extended run, Broadway World awards for Best Actress Crystal Moser and Supporting Actor Jason Wilson[63][64]
  • 2012: Who's Your Baghdaddy, or How I Started the Iraq War (reading) Joe's Pub NYC 2012 [65][66]
  • 2012: Rio by Mitch Magonet and Joey Miller (reading) CUA-NYMF[67][68]
  • 2012: Baby Case by Michael Ogborn (festival production) NY New Musical Festival, Best Show, Best Director, Best Composer[69][70][71]
  • 2012: Triassic Parq, by Marshall Pailet (production) Amas Musical Theater, NYC[72]
  • 2013: F@#king Up Everything, by Eric Davis & Sam Forman (production) Elektra Theatre NYC[73][74][75]
  • 2013: Standby, by Amy Baer, Keith Robinson & Mark-Eugene Garcia (reading) CUA-NYMF [76]
  • 2013: Mata Hari, by David Rhymer, (festival production) NY Musical Festival (Best Actress, Onalea Gilbertson)[77][78]
  • 2013 Dizzy Miss Lizzie's "The Brontes" New York Musical Festival[79]
  • 2013: One Night in New York, 2013 DC Capital Fringe Festival (Best Show)[80][81][82]
  • 2013: Tesla (reading) by Marc Acito, Jeames Beaton, and Amy Englehardt (reading) New York, NY supported by the NAMT Fund for New Musicals. Directed by Kent Nicholson [83]
  • 2014: Who's Your Baghdaddy or How I Started the Iraq War (reading) by Marshall Pailet and A.D. Penedo, Directed by Marshall Pailet[84]
  • 2015: Who's Your Baghdaddy, The Actor's Temple, New York, NY, NY Times Critic's Pick [31]
  • 2017: Baghdaddy, St. Luke's Theatre, New York, NY[32]

References[edit]

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  4. ^ Patrice APODACA (14 December 1993). "It's High-Tech Playtime". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 6 March 2015. 
  5. ^ "Charlie Fink's Metaverse - An AR Enabled Guide to AR & VR". Cool Blue Media. 8 January 2018. Retrieved 26 January 2018. 
  6. ^ "An AR Enabled Guide To The Metaverse". SXSW. Retrieved 26 January 2018. 
  7. ^ Charlie Fink (Contributing Editor): What's Ahead for AR and VR in 2017/2018 (Speech). Augmented World Expo (AWE). 12 June 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2018. 
  8. ^ The Developing Market For Comsumer AR (Speech). AR in ACTION. 17 July 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2018. 
  9. ^ VRTO2017 VR Toronto - Charlie Fink - VR/AR 2017 and Beyond: Reality, Evolution, & Revolution (Speech). VR Toronto VRTO Virtual Reality, Toronto. 10 August 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2018. 
  10. ^ "Apple AR Is Already Blowing Up". VRVoice. 15 August 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2018. 
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  17. ^ David Seidman (19 January 1995). "A 'Toon Man for the Ages". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 6 March 2015. 
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  34. ^ Hannah Maria Hayes (7 September 2017). "The Chita Rivera Awards Honored the Unsung Heroes of Stage and Screenóthe Dancers". Dance Teacher. Retrieved 26 January 2018. 
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