Cheveley Castle

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Cheveley Castle
Cheveley, Cambridgeshire, England
Cheveley Castle is located in Cambridgeshire
Cheveley Castle
Cheveley Castle
Coordinates 52°13′28″N 0°27′23″E / 52.22441°N 0.45630°E / 52.22441; 0.45630
Type Fortified manor house in an Edwardian style
Site information
Condition Only limited masonry survives
Site history
Materials Stone

Cheveley Castle was a medieval fortified manor house near Cheveley, Cambridgeshire, England.

Details[edit]

Cheveley Castle was built by Sir John Pulteney, a merchant-financier and Lord Mayor of London, around 1341 on the outskirts of the village of Cheveley.[1] The castle was built in an Edwardian style, with four circular towers, gatehouse and a bailey wall, on an elaborate moated site north-west of the village.[2] It is the only castle of its type to have been built in Cambridgeshire, and was probably intended less for defence than as a high-status hunting lodge - in the 14th century, Cheveley was at the centre of a deer park.[3] The moat at Cheveley may have inspired other, similar moated designs across the eastern region.[4]

The castle deteroriated after the early 17th-century, and today only limited masonry remains exist on the site, which is a scheduled monument.[3]

See also[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Creighton, Oliver Hamilton. (2005) Castles and Landscapes: Power, Community and Fortification in Medieval England. London: Equinox. ISBN 978-1-904768-67-8.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cheveley: Manors and estate, A History of the County of Cambridge and the Isle of Ely: Volume 10: Cheveley, Flendish, Staine and Staploe Hundreds (north-eastern Cambridgeshire) (2002). Accessed: 20 May 2011.
  2. ^ Cheveley: Manors and estate, A History of the County of Cambridge and the Isle of Ely: Volume 10: Cheveley, Flendish, Staine and Staploe Hundreds (north-eastern Cambridgeshire) (2002). Accessed: 20 May 2011.; Cheveley Castle, Gatehouse website, accessed 20 May 2011..
  3. ^ a b Cheveley Castle, Gatehouse website, accessed 20 May 2011.
  4. ^ Creighton, p.195.