Chintila

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Imaginary portrait of Chintila by Bernardino Montañés in the Museo del Prado. Oil on canvas, 1855[1]

Chintila (Latin: Chintila, Chintilla, Cintila; c. 606 – 20 December 639) was a Visigothic King of Hispania, Septimania and Galicia from 636.[2] He succeeded Sisenand and reigned until he died of natural causes,[3] ruling over the fifth and sixth Councils of Toledo.[4] He wrote poetry as well.[5]

Reign[edit]

Chintila became king after his predecessor Sisenand died in 636. It is unknown if or how he was related to Sisenand, and it is equally unclear how it came to be that Chintilla succeeded Sisenand.[6] Both kings had tumultuous reigns, facing rebellions orchestrated by others who held some claim to the throne.[7]

Chintilla convened two Councils at Toledo, the Fifth Council of Toledo in 636 and the Sixth Council of Toledo in 638.[8] The Sixth Council discussed topics such as church rules, the treatment of Jewish people in Chintila's kingdom, and even laws of the kingdom regarding citizens' rights and property law. One decision that was made, for example, was that only a person of Visigothic noble descent could be king.[9] 53 bishops, deacons, or other church representatives attended the Sixth Council of Toledo.[10]

Religion[edit]

As king, Chintila ensured that the Visigothic citizenry was entirely Christian, going so far as to ban Jewish people from the kingdom. The Sixth Council of Toledo commended him on these efforts, asking God to ensure that the king lives a long life and pledging to remain vigilant so that these policies continued into the future.[11] This practice of persecution had become wide-spread under King Sisebut (r. 611/612-620[12]), who mandated conversion. This practice was later condemned by the Fourth Council of Toledo.[13] Chintila adopted similar practices and the later council approved.

Poetry[edit]

King Chintila's poetry is indicative of the popular style of the time. An example is a poem that was sent to Pope Honorius I either shortly before or shortly after the Pope's death. Chintila donated a covering (or "velum") of some kind to St. Peter's Basilica, with a poem on it glorifying Pope Honorius and St. Peter, as well as praying for salvation.[14]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Brodman, James. (1979). The Roman-Visigothic Councils: Sixth Council of Toledo. Classical Folia: Studies in the Christian Perpetuation of the Classics. 33. 5.
    • This source was from James Brodman, and is an English translation of the Sixth Council of Toledo.
  • Carr, Raymond, and Roger Collins. “Visigothic Spain, 409-711.” Essay. In Spain: A History, 39-62. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2001.
    • This source establishes that Chintila was a poet as well as being a king. Because he is only mentioned in one sentence on one page, it can't correlate to any broader themes, nor can it give any specifics.
  • Collins, Roger. “The Seventh-Century Kingdom.” Essay. In Early Medieval Spain: Unity in Diversity, 400-1000, 120. New York, NY: St Martin's Press, 1995.
  • Heather, Peter. “The Kingdoms of the Goths: Sixth-Century Crises and Beyond.” Essay. In The Goths, 283–84. Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishers, 1998.
  • Kelly, Michael J. “The Liber Iudiciorum: A Visigothic Literary Guide to Institutional Authority and Self-Interest.” In The Visigothic Kingdom: The Negotiation of Power in Post-Roman Lberia, edited by Sabine Panzram and Paulo Pachá, 257–72. Amsterdam University Press, 2020. doi:10.2307/j.ctv1c5cs6z.17.
  • Montañés Y Pérez, Bernadino. Chintila. Madrid, Spain: Museo Nacional del Prado, January 28, 2022. Museo Nacional del Prado. Madrid, Spain. https://www.museodelprado.es/en/the-collection/art-work/chintila/2e0c4d77-1870-4c4e-a169-32defa721da7.
    • Note: This source was only used as far as being where the image was taken from.
  • Sarris, Peter. “The Princes of the Western Nations.” Essay. In Empires of Faith: The Fall of Rome to the Rise of Islam, 500-700, 320. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2011.
  • Trout, Dennis. “Poets and Readers in Seventh-Century Rome: Pope Honorius, Lucretius, and the Doors of St. Peter's: Traditio.” Cambridge Core. Cambridge University Press, October 30, 2020. https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/traditio/article/poets-and-readers-in-seventhcentury-rome-pope-honorius-lucretius-and-the-doors-of-st-peters/ECC52321B6836F48091B1B6A8263D310.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bernadino Montañés Y Pérez, “Chintila,” Chintila (Madrid, Spain: Museo Nacional del Prado, January 28, 2022), https://www.museodelprado.es/en/the-collection/art-work/chintila/2e0c4d77-1870-4c4e-a169-32defa721da7.
  2. ^ Kelly, Michael J. (2020-12-23), "The Liber Iudiciorum", The Visigothic Kingdom, Amsterdam University Press, pp. 257–272, retrieved 2022-10-14
  3. ^ Sarris, Peter (2011). Empires of Faith: The Fall of Rome to the Rise of Islam, 500-700. New York, NY: Oxford University Press. p. 320. ISBN 978-0-19-926126-0.
  4. ^ Collins, Roger (1995). Early medieval Spain: Unity in Diversity, 400-1000 (2nd ed.). New York, NY: St. Martin's Press. p. 120. ISBN 0-333-26282-4.
  5. ^ Carr, Raymond; Collins, Roger (2001). "Visigothic Spain, 409-711". Spain: A History. New York, NY: Oxford University Press. p. 49.
  6. ^ Collins, Roger (1995). Early medieval Spain: Unity in Diversity, 400-1000 (2nd ed.). New York, NY: St. Martin's Press. p. 120. ISBN 0-333-26282-4.
  7. ^ Sarris, Peter (2011). Empires of Faith: The Fall of Rome to the Rise of Islam, 500-700. New York, NY: Oxford University Press. p. 320. ISBN 978-0-19-926126-0.
  8. ^ Collins, Roger (1995). Early medieval Spain: Unity in Diversity, 400-1000 (2nd ed.). New York, NY: St. Martin's Press. p. 120. ISBN 0-333-26282-4.
  9. ^ Peter Heather, “The Kingdoms of the Goths: Sixth-Century Crises and Beyond,” in The Goths (Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishers, 1998), pp. 283-284.
  10. ^ Brodman, James (January 1979). "The Roman-Visigothic Councils: Sixth Council of Toledo". Classical Folia. 33 (1): 5–18.
  11. ^ Brodman, James (January 1979). "The Roman-Visigothic Councils: Sixth Council of Toledo". Classical Folia. 33 (1): 5–18.
  12. ^ Raymond Carr and Roger Collins, “Visigothic Spain,” in Spain: A History (New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2001), pp. 55-56.
  13. ^ Carr and Collins, 60
  14. ^ Trout, Dennis (30 October 2020). "Poets and Readers in Seventh-Century Rome: Pope Honorius, Lucretius, and the Doors of St. Peter's". Traditio. 75: 39–85. doi:10.1017/tdo.2020.3. ISSN 0362-1529 – via Cambridge Core.
Regnal titles
Preceded by King of the Visigoths
12 March 636 – 20 December 639
Succeeded by