Chris M. Allport

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Chris M. Allport
BornAugust 23, 1977

Chris M. Allport (born Christopher M. Allport; August 23, 1977) is an American symphonic composer, producer, director, television and film actor, voice actor, and singer. As a youth voice artist during the 1990s he received awards for his voice work in film and television and as a singer and actor.

Career[edit]

In his early career, Allport portrayed characters for Disney, Warner Brothers and Amblin Entertainment. He was the voice of Tootles the Lost Boy, in Fox Children's Network Peter Pan and the Pirates, for which he received both a 1991 Young Artist Award nomination,[1] and a 1992 Young Artist Award win.[2] In Steven Spielberg's Hook, Allport dubbed the crowing sounds for Robin Williams when William's character begins flying and realizes that he really is Peter Pan. In 1993, Allport provided additional voices for the movie Hocus Pocus, including re-voicing the role of the black cat, Binx. Later on as an adult he played a pirate that was singing on the way to the gallows in the opening scene of Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End, and he also appears on the movie soundtrack in the song "Hoist the Colors".

In 2000, Allport sang as a back-up singer to Barbra Streisand in her Timeless: Live in Concert Tour concert at Staples Center in Los Angeles. That same year, he also served as a talent producer for the 2000 Democratic National Convention at Staples Center, where, as an employee of the Gary Smith Company, he served as a talent producer, and working directly with Al Gore, Hillary Clinton, Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter.

In 2008, Allport released a duet single of David Foster's "The Prayer" with duet partner Ariana Richards.[3]

In the summer of 2009, also directed The Bilderberg Club, a pilot that he created with collaborative partner, Julia Diana Alexander, a fictional expose of the shadow one world government.[4]

On August 29, 2010, Allport performed his new live show "Living the Dream" at Sterling's Upstairs at Vitellos.[5][needs update]

January – March 2011, Allport tours Italy, Poland and France with European Soprano, Dominika Zamara, as they star together in Mystique.

May 5, 2011, Developed in Europe with noted soprano, Dominika Zamara, Allport debuted the Mystique Touring show in Los Angeles at the historic Warner Grand Theatre. Mystique stars Allport and Zamara and features original compositions by Maria Newman, Alfred Newman as well as Emmy-award winning composers Steve and Julie Bernstein.

January 15, 2012, Allport directed the motion picture and live broadcast of the Young Musicians Foundation Gala featuring conductors Michael Tilson Thomas, Joey Newman and John Williams.

He is also an accomplished and commissioned composer, with works including "Through the Windows on a Train," a modern classical piece with arrangements for full orchestra, chamber orchestra, and piano; "Song of Solomon," an epic wedding duet; "Arise, Awake O Christmas Day," an eighth-part choral masterpiece; and "Shenandoah," an arrangement of the traditional folk song.

Filmography[edit]

Discography[edit]

Soundtrack Performances[edit]

Activism[edit]

Allport had been a youth representative for the Screen Actors Guild.[7] He contributed significantly to legislation protecting the welfare, educational and financial rights of young performers and all children.

In 1999 Allport testified before legislative panels in California and New York on the need for statutory protection for child actors' earnings. He did this with Paul Petersen, founder in 1990 of A Minor Consideration, a nonprofit group devoted to protecting and advancing the interests of child actors.

In 2002 he was appointed by Melissa Gilbert, then President of the Screen Actors Guild, as the national chair of its Young Performers Committee, a joint committee with the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, co-chaired by Paul Petersen.[8][9]

As of December 1, 2017 Allport was appointed by Paul Petersen, as President of A Minor Consideration.

Awards & nominations[edit]

  • 1986, Won Whimsy Works Award for "A Lad in Baghdad"
  • 1987, Won Whimsy Works Award for "A Lad in Baghdad"
  • 1991, nominated for Young Artist Award for 'Outstanding Voice-Over in an Animation Series' for Peter Pan and the Pirates[1]
  • 1992, Won Young Artist Award for 'Outstanding Young Voice-Over in an Animated Series or Special' for Peter Pan and the Pirates[2]
  • 1993, nominated Young Artist Award for 'Best Youth Actor in a Voiceover Role – TV or Movie' for Recycle Rex[10]
  • 1994, Won Young Artist Award for 'Best performance by a Young Actor'[11]
  • 1995, Won Young Artist Award for 'Best Professional Actor/Singer'[11]
  • 1996, nominated for Young Artist Award for 'Best Male Entertainer'[12]
  • 1999, Won Show Us Los Angeles Video Awards of Excellence 'Best Picture,' 'Young Musicians Foundation Debut Orchestra in Concert'
  • 2000, Won Show Us Los Angeles Video Awards of Excellence 'Best Picture,' 'Life is too Short to Sing Badly'
  • 2011, Won Park City Film Music Festival 'Gold Medal for Excellence,' 'Life is too Short to Sing Badly'
  • 2016, Won Los Angeles Movie Awards 'Best Documentary Short,' 'From Manzanar to the Divided States of America'
  • 2017, Won Los Angeles Movie Awards 'Audience Award Winner,' 'From Manzanar to the Divided States of America'

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Thirteenth Annual Youth in Film Awards 1990-1991". Young Artist Awards. Archived from the original on 3 April 2011. Retrieved 17 April 2010.
  2. ^ a b "Fourteenth Annual Youth in Film Awards 1991-1992". Young Artist Awards. Archived from the original on 15 January 2010. Retrieved 17 April 2010.
  3. ^ "The kids from Jurassic Park: Ariana Richards". Comedy Central. Archived from the original on April 15, 2009. Retrieved 17 April 2010.
  4. ^ Philomena Bankston; Ca'Shawn Sims (3 December 2009). "Child stars transition in biz". Variety. Retrieved 17 April 2010.
  5. ^ http://www.vitellosrestaurant.com/
  6. ^ http://EmilyorOscar.com
  7. ^ Westfall, Julie (2 September 1997). "Teen theater trip a success". Google News Archive. Sarasota Herald-Tribune. Retrieved 17 April 2010.
  8. ^ McNary, Dave (24 September 2002). "SAG board results show Gilbert lean". Variety. Retrieved 17 April 2010.
  9. ^ Pool, Bob (12 August 1997). "New Rules on Child Actors Applauded". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 17 April 2010.
  10. ^ "Fifteenth Annual Youth in Film Awards 1992-1993". Young Artist Awards. Archived from the original on 25 March 2006. Retrieved 17 April 2010.
  11. ^ a b "Seventeenth Annual Youth in Film Awards 1994-1995". Young Artist Awards. Archived from the original on 12 December 2009. Retrieved 17 April 2010.
  12. ^ "Eighteenth Annual Youth in Film Awards 1995-1996". Young Artist Awards. Archived from the original on 24 June 2012. Retrieved 17 April 2010.

External links[edit]