Christiane Rousseau

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Christiane Rousseau (born March 30, 1954 in Versailles, France) is a French and Canadian mathematician, a professor in the department of mathematics and statistics at the Université de Montréal. She was president of the Canadian Mathematical Society from 2002 to 2004.[1]

Education and career[edit]

Rousseau earned her Ph.D. from the Université de Montréal in 1977, under the supervision of Dana Schlomiuk.[1][2] After postdoctoral research at McGill University, she joined the Montréal faculty in 1979, and was promoted to full professor in 1991.[1]

Recognition[edit]

She has received the Adrien-Pouliot Prize and the Abel-Gauthier Prize of the Mathematical Association of Québec,[1] the 2009 Graham Wright Award for Distinguished Service from the Canadian Mathematical Society,[3] and the 2014 George Pólya Award of the Mathematical Association of America for her article "How Inge Lehmann Discovered the Inner Core of the Earth".[4] In 2012, she became a fellow of the American Mathematical Society (AMS).[5] In 2017 she became the inaugural recipient of the AMS' Bertrand Russell prize for furthering human values and the common good through mathematics.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Curriculum vitae, retrieved 2014-12-17.
  2. ^ Christiane Rousseau at the Mathematics Genealogy Project
  3. ^ Christiane Rousseau to Receive the 2009 Graham Wright Award for Distinguished Service, Canadian Mathematical Society, retrieved 2014-12-17.
  4. ^ How Inge Lehmann Discovered the Inner Core of the Earth, Mathematical Association of America, retrieved 2014-12-17.
  5. ^ List of Fellows of the American Mathematical Society, retrieved 2014-12-17.
  6. ^ "2018 Bertrand Russell Prize" (PDF), Notices of the American Mathematical Society, 65 (4): 470, April 2018