Christopher Lukas

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Christopher Lukas
Born (1935-03-06) March 6, 1935 (age 82)
White Plains, New York
Occupation Television producer, non-fiction writer, stage actor, director
Nationality  United States
Genre Psychology non-fiction
Spouse Susan Ries (m. 1962)

Christopher Lukas (born March 6, 1935) is an American writer, stage actor, television producer and director who, for the past forty-five years, has worked primarily for public television. From 1963 to 1971 he produced for WNET in New York City, making over 200 hours of programming for the educational station. In 1969 he was promoted to director of programming.

His birth, early years, and education[edit]

Christopher "Kit" Lukas was born to Elizabeth and Edwin Lukas in White Plains, New York. His mother was an actress, and his uncle Paul Lukas was an Academy Award–winning actor. After his mother's death by suicide and his father's illness after her death, he was at the age of six enrolled in the coeducational Putney School boarding school in Vermont. He was graduated with high honors from Swarthmore and married Susan Ries in 1962. His older brother was J. Anthony Lukas, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and writer.[1]

Career[edit]

Television[edit]

After his work with public television, Lukas moved into the freelance world in 1971, working for public TV stations in San Francisco and Chicago, among others. His works for PBS include: The Mystery of Love, The World of Abnormal Psychology, Music From Aspen, Whose Death is It, Anyway?, Moyers: Report from Philadelphia, The Do It Yourself Messiah, and The Talking Walls of Pompeii. His non-television works include videos for non-profit organizations.

Acting[edit]

While continuing to work in video and television, Lukas returned in 2002 to the field of acting. He has appeared off-Broadway and in regional theaters, playing a wide variety of roles in plays by Shakespeare, Dostoyevsky, Chekhov, and Stoppard.

Writing[edit]

As a writer of books, he has concentrated on end-of-life matters. These works include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lukas, Christopher (2008). Blue Genes: A Memoir of Loss and Survival. New York: Doubleday. ISBN 978-0-385-52520-6. LCCN 2008006648. OCLC 202538435.