Church of St Michael, Stawley

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Church of St Michael
Stawley church.jpg
Church of St Michael, Stawley is located in Somerset
Church of St Michael, Stawley
Location within Somerset
General information
Town or city Stawley
Country England
Coordinates 50°59′44″N 3°20′25″W / 50.9955°N 3.3404°W / 50.9955; -3.3404
Completed 13th century

The Church of St Michael in Stawley, Somerset, England dates from the 13th century and has been designated as a Grade I listed building.[1]

The current church stands on the site of an earlier Norman church from which some herringbone pattern walling survives in the nave.[2]

Much of the current church was built in early 16th century, paid for by local farmer and trader Henry Howe, who is remembered by a scroll over the door. Additional funding, possibly by the family of John Poulett, 1st Baron Poulett, paid for the tower which displays their coat of arms with three swords.[3]

The church register dates from 1528.[4] Despite some minor Victorian restoration in 1873 the church fabric is largely as it would have been in medieval times.[5] In 2007 a sixth bell, which had previously been at the Church of St Peter and St Paul in Maperton, was added to the existing peel in the three-stage west tower.[6][5]

The Anglican parish is part of the benefice of Wellington and district within the archdeadconry of Taunton.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Church of St Michael". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 2008-10-17. 
  2. ^ "Stawley St. Michael and All Angels". Dawson Heritage. Retrieved 18 November 2012. 
  3. ^ Dunning, Robert (1996). Fifty Somerset Churches. Somerset Books. pp. 87–89. ISBN 978-0861833092. 
  4. ^ "Stawley". Wiveliscombe Area Website. Retrieved 2009-04-25. 
  5. ^ a b "St Michael and All Angels, Stawley". Wellington Team Churches. Retrieved 18 November 2012. 
  6. ^ "Stawley, Somerset. St Michael". Keltek Trust. Retrieved 18 November 2012. 
  7. ^ "St Michael & All Angels, Stawley". Church of England. Retrieved 18 November 2012.