Clifford Richmond

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The Right Honourable
Sir Clifford Richmond
KBE
President of the Court of Appeal
In office
1976–1981
Preceded by Thaddeus McCarthy
Succeeded by Owen Woodhouse
Personal details
Born Clifford Parris Richmond
(1914-06-23)23 June 1914
Auckland, New Zealand
Died 29 January 1997(1997-01-29) (aged 82)
Auckland, New Zealand
Spouse(s)
Valerie Jean Hamilton (m. 1939)
Relatives Henry Robert Richmond (grandfather)
Emma Jane Richmond (grandmother)
Robert Parris (great-grandfather)
James Crowe Richmond (great-uncle)
William Richmond (great-uncle)
Jane Maria Atkinson (great-aunt)

Sir Clifford Parris "Kip" Richmond KBE PC (23 June 1914 – 29 January 1997) was a New Zealand lawyer and judge, and former president of the Court of Appeal of New Zealand.

Richmond attended Auckland University College and Victoria University College, graduating LLM with first-class honours in 1937.[1] On 16 March 1938 he married Valerie Jean Hamilton at St Andrew's Church in central Auckland.[2] During World War II he was an officer in the New Zealand Artillery.[3] Richmond served in the Fourth Field Regiment in North Africa and Italy. He was mentioned in despatches, attained the rank of major and became the personal staff officer to General Freyberg.

He practised as a partner in the firm Buddle Richmond, later Buddle Richmond Weir, for 15 years, establishing a reputation as a first-class adviser, particularly in matters of commercial law.

Richmond was appointed a judge of the New Zealand Supreme Court in 1960, and then the New Zealand Court of Appeal in 1972,[4] and in the following year, he became a Privy Counsellor on the Judicial Committee. He was president of the Court of Appeal from 1976 until his retirement in 1981.[4]

In the 1972 Queen's Birthday Honours Richmond was appointed a Knight Bachelor for outstanding services to the law,[5] and he was made a Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire in the 1977 Queen's Birthday and Silver Jubilee Honours.[6] In 2014, Richmond Chambers, a set of barristers based in Auckland, was named in his honour.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "NZ university graduates 1870–1961: Q–R". Retrieved 20 April 2015. 
  2. ^ "Charming wedding". New Zealand Herald. 17 March 1938. p. 3. Retrieved 20 April 2015. 
  3. ^ "New Zealand, World War II appointments, promotions, transfers and resignations, 1939–1945". Ancestry.com. 2014. Retrieved 20 April 2015. (Subscription required (help)). 
  4. ^ a b "About Richmond Chambers". Richmond Chambers. Retrieved 20 April 2015. 
  5. ^ "No. 45680". The London Gazette (Supplement). 3 June 1972. p. 6293. 
  6. ^ "No. 47237". The London Gazette (Supplement). 11 June 1977. p. 7128.