Clyde Taylor

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Clyde Taylor is an African-American writer and film scholar, who is an emeritus professor at New York University, and a contributor to journals such as Black Film Review and Jump Cut.[1][2][3][4][5][6] He coined the term 'L.A. Rebellion' for the Los Angeles School of Black Filmmakers movement.[7][8] He wrote the documentary film, Midnight Ramble, and is the author of The Mask of Art: Breaking the Aesthetic Contract – Film and Literature (Indiana University Press, 1998).[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "MILES DAVIS; Backward Reasoning". Nytimes.com. 27 May 2001. Retrieved 3 September 2017. 
  2. ^ "Africana Studies". africanastudies.as.nyu.edu. Retrieved 3 September 2017. 
  3. ^ "Symposium Participants - UCLA Film & Television Archive". Cinema.ucla.edu. Retrieved 3 September 2017. 
  4. ^ "Clyde Taylor, "One struggle, many fronts"". Jump Cut, no. 23. October 1980. pp. 10–11. 
  5. ^ "Africana Studies". africanastudies.as.nyu.edu. Retrieved 3 September 2017. 
  6. ^ "Humanism, Cinema and Engagement: Clyde Taylor and the L.A. Rebellion Symposium - UCLA Film & Television Archive". Cinema.ucla.edu. Retrieved 3 September 2017. 
  7. ^ "What's in a Name? L.A. Rebellion - UCLA Film & Television Archive". Cinema.ucla.edu. Retrieved 3 September 2017. 
  8. ^ Guerrero, Ed (20 June 2012). "Framing Blackness: The African American Image in Film". Temple University Press. Retrieved 3 September 2017 – via Google Books. 
  9. ^ Taylor, Clyde (3 September 1998). "The Mask of Art: Breaking the Aesthetic Contract--film and Literature". Indiana University Press. Retrieved 3 September 2017 – via Google Books.