Coal-water slurry fuel

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Coal-water slurry fuel is a combustionable mixture of fine coal particles suspended in water. It can be used to power boilers, gas turbines, diesel engines and heating and power stations.

Characteristics[edit]

Coal-water slurry fuel, Grade III

A coal-water slurry fuel is defined by a number of factors including its viscosity, particle size, rate of sedimentation, ignition temperature (800–850 °C [1,470–1,560 °F]), combustion temperature (950–1,150 °C [1,740–2,100 °F]), ash content and calorific value (3700–4700 kcal/kg).

When coal-water slurry fuel combusts, over ninety-nine percent of its carbon content is consumed. Coal-water slurry fuel is fire-proof and explosion-proof. Ash content of less than ten percent is desirable for boilers. For diesel engines, there is no limit.

Production[edit]

Ball mills for production of coal water slurry in Russia

The production of coal-water slurry fuel involves the crushing of coal or coal sludge to particles between 10 and 65 micrometers diameter (standard crushers can be used); wet milling and homogenisation (with additives as required); and preparation for intermediate storage.

Large particle coal-water slurry fuel can be used to produce steam in boilers. Smaller (under 80 micrometer) particle coal-water slurry fuel can be used in diesel engines with or without co-fuels. For example, low speed marine or modular power plant diesels can operate on pure coal-water slurry fuel whereas medium speed diesels such as locomotive engines may need diesel 2 as a co-fuel which will act as an ignition source. Very small (5 to 10 micrometer) particle coal-water slurry fuel has been trialled in combined cycle gas turbine power plants. Smaller sized particles are more versatile in use but are more difficult to produce.

Prototypes[edit]

Combustion of coal water slurry fuel in a steam boiler, Murmanskaya region, Russia.[1]

Converting coal into a liquid form may simplify the delivery and dispensing of the fuel. It may be a cost-efficient alternative to oil and natural gas. Separating non-carbonaceous material before making the slurry may reduce the production of ash to two percent.

Development[edit]

Belovo Novosibirsk project[edit]

In the late 1950s, the Soviet Union looked for new methods of using coal sludge for power generation. Coal-water slurry fuel was made in a Ball mill which pulverised the coal or coal sludge. This was done near a coal mine in Belovo, Siberia. The coal-water slurry fuel was transported through a pipeline to Novosibirskaya TEC-5, Novosibirsk, a distance of 262 kilometres (163 mi). The pipeline had three intermediate pumping stations. The Belovo Novosibirsk project used coal-water slurry fuel in steam boilers at a rate of 1340 tonnes per hour.[3] There was a further project at Belovo Novosibirsk between 1989 and 1993 and development of coal-water slurry fuel technology for district heating stations and power stations.[4] In 2004, a coal water slurry fuel production plant was opened at Enskiy village, Murmansk.[5]

Austria[edit]

Coal water slurry fuel production machine in Austria

In 2012, the Austrian company, Effective Energy Technology GmbH (EET) built facilities for production and combustion of coal-water slurry fuel in Europe. Examples of the technology in practice are hydroshock type wet-milling devices and standard water boilers equipped with a coal-water slurry nozzle.[6]

Ukraine[edit]

Verkhovna Rada requested China Development Bank credit for the implementation of coal-water slurry fuel technology.[7] Ukteplokom, a state owned entity, commenced operation.[8][9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Горение ВУТ в котле ДКВР-6,5-13. Видео 1. 
  2. ^ Production of CWS, video[dead link]
  3. ^ "Belovo-Novosibirsk project." Vodougol.ru archived 5 February 2015.
  4. ^ "ЖИДКИЙ УГОЛЬ; Блог о Водоугольном Топливе." Liquidcoal.ru |Accessed 30 March 2013 in Russian. Dead link.
  5. ^ "Водоугольное топливо в пос. Ёнский" Vodougol.ru
  6. ^ "Coal water slurry production unit" cwstech.at in English.
  7. ^ [1] Forum.for-ua.com. Dead link.
  8. ^ "Energy of Nature" ukrproject.gov.ua. Dead link.
  9. ^ Biletsky V. et al "Fundamentals of highly loaded coal water slurries." CRC Press, Taylor and Francis Group, London, UK. A Balkema Book 2013 p105-114.]

External links[edit]