Cochu's blue tetra

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Cochu's blue tetra
Boehlkea fredcochui.jpg
Not evaluated (IUCN 3.1)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Characiformes
Family: Characidae
Genus: Boehlkea
Species: B. fredcochui
Binomial name
Boehlkea fredcochui
Géry, 1966

Boehlkea fredcochui, also known as the Cochu's blue tetra is a species of characin. Its natural range is in the Amazon Basin. It is commonly kept as an aquarium fish.[1][2] This species has most likely not been seen in the hobby for many years.

Aquarium Care[edit]

Boehlkea fredcochui, Male and Female
  • Maximum length: 5.5 cm (2.2 in)
  • Colors: Blue, pink
  • Temperature preference: 22-27 Celsius (71-80 Fahrenheit)
  • pH preference: 6 to 7.5
  • Hardness preference: Soft to medium (less than 15ºd)
  • Salinity preference: No salt
  • Compatibility: Generally peaceful, may nip fins during feeding or when stressed
  • Life span: Typically 2 to 3 years
  • Ease of keeping: Easy
  • Ease of breeding: Moderate to hard

As for other schooling characins, the cochu's blue tetra should always be kept in groups of at least six. A very active fish, it requires open areas in which to swim and is best kept in aquariums 90 cm (35 in) or larger. Aggression is generally limited to conspecifics in appropriate setups, but they may harass other fish in too small a tank, or without enough other tetras.

Spawning may occur in home setups, with the eggs being scattered over fine leafed plants. Soft, acidic water is required for hatching to occur. Males may be differentiated from females by their slimmer, more streamlined form and more intense colouration.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2016). "Boehlkea fredcochui" in FishBase. January 2016 version.
  2. ^ Thomaz, A.T., Arcila, D., Ortí, G. & Malabarba, L.R. (2015): Molecular phylogeny of the subfamily Stevardiinae Gill, 1858 (Characiformes: Characidae): classification and the evolution of reproductive traits. BMC Evolutionary Biology, (2015) 15: 146.