Coeur d'Alene Resort

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The Coeur d'Alene Resort
Golf Course
Floatinggreen.jpg
The Floating Green - (14th Hole)
on Lake Coeur d'Alene in 2005
Club information
Coeur d'Alene Resort is located in Idaho
Coeur d'Alene Resort
Location of the resort in north Idaho
Coordinates 47°40′19″N 116°47′02″W / 47.672°N 116.784°W / 47.672; -116.784Coordinates: 47°40′19″N 116°47′02″W / 47.672°N 116.784°W / 47.672; -116.784
Location Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, U.S.
Established 1991, 26 years ago
Type Resort / Public
Owned by Duane B. Hagadone
& Jerry J. Jaeger
Operated by Hagadone Hospitality
Total holes 18
Website cdaresort.com
Designed by Scott Miller
Par 71
Length 6,803 yd (6,221 m) (gold)[1]
6,355 yd (5,811 m) (blue)
5,914 yd (5,408 m) (tan)
5,436 yd (4,971 m) (copper)
4,448 yd (4,067 m) (mauve)
Course rating 71.8, 70.1 (blue), 68.2 (tan)[2]
Slope rating 127, 122 (blue), 116 (tan)[2]
Course record 64
ResortLogo.jpg

The Coeur d'Alene Resort is a luxury resort hotel in the northwest United States, located in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho. Seated on the north shore of Lake Coeur d'Alene, the Coeur d Alene Resort features a marina, convention facilities, spa, as well as a notable 18-hole golf course. The hotel has 338 rooms and suites, and its main tower has 18 floors.

History[edit]

The North Shore Resort opened 52 years ago in 1965 and completed its seven-story tower in 1973;[3] it was acquired by Hagadone Hospitality in June 1983 in a takeover of Western Frontiers, Inc.[4][5][6] Duane Hagadone soon announced plans for resort expansion,[7] and the North Shore closed on New Year's Day in 1986 for several months; it reopened in the spring with a new name: "The Coeur d'Alene: A Resort on the Lake."[8][9] The new 18-story addition, known as the Lake Tower, was built by Hagadone and Jerry Jaeger and opened 31 years ago in May 1986.[10][11] Designed by architect R.G. Nelson, the hotel features a 0.75-mile (1.2 km) floating boardwalk.

The golf course is about a mile east of the resort and was originally the site of the Rutledge sawmill,[12][13] which operated from 1916 until October 31, 1987.[14][15][16] The Hagadone Corporation bought the property from Potlatch Corporation in March 1988 via a three-way land swap,[17][18] and its buildings were allowed to be burned in June; local fire departments used it as a training exercise.[19][20]

The golf course and the floating green were developed, and the course opened for play 26 years ago in 1991.[21][22][23] The construction of the golf course required environmental clean-up of the debris left from the lumber industry,[12] and had stalled in August 1988.[24][25] With environmental concerns allayed, the project was well received in January and course construction began in 1989.[26]

The original portion of the resort, the seven-story Park Tower, completed a renovation in 2000,[6] as did the signature Lake Tower in 2006.[27]

Golf course[edit]

The Coeur d'Alene Resort Golf Course is best known for its floating green on the 14th hole,[21][22][23][28] and location on the north shore of Lake Coeur d'Alene.[29][30] The 2,300-ton floating green was installed in September 1990 and unveiled by Hagadone and Governor Cecil Andrus shortly after;[28][31] the course opened the following spring.[21][22][23]

Phoenix-based designer Scott Miller planned the course to feel like a park, and it has since been ranked among the best resort golf courses in the United States by Golf Digest, Golf Magazine and others.[30][32] The course was featured in the video game Tiger Woods PGA Tour 2005; its average elevation is approximately 2,200 feet (670 m) above sea level.

Scorecard[edit]

Coeur d'Alene Resort Golf Course
Tee Rating/Slope 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Out 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 In Total
Par 5 4 3 4 3 3 4 4 5 35 4 5 3 4 3 5 4 4 4 36 71
Handicap Men's 7 3 17 5 13 15 11 9 1 6 2 14 12 10 16 8 18 4
Gold 71.8 / 127 540 479 155 322 148 169 435 437 601 3286 469 538 249 368 218 495 429 269 482 3517 6803
Combo 70.6 / 125 540 436 155 307 148 169 395 437 566 3153 469 522 208 368 175 495 417 269 451 3374 6527
Blue 70.1 / 122 526 436 128 307 132 163 395 420 566 3073 438 522 208 336 175 478 417 257 451 3282 6355
Tan M:68.2/116 W:73.1/129 499 377 114 256 120 155 389 399 540 2849 406 506 180 293 147 462 401 236 434 3065 5914
Par 5 4 3 4 3 3 4 4 5 35 4 5 3 4 3 5 4 4 4 36 71
Handicap Women's 3 7 15 9 17 13 11 5 1 10 2 18 16 12 8 6 14 4
Copper 70.2 / 126 424 327 108 249 105 136 350 370 510 2579 351 484 148 278 137 443 391 229 396 2857 5436
Mauve 64.8 / 113 387 285 88 220 91 124 240 308 425 2168 256 395 133 171 95 373 313 208 336 2280 4448

Source:[1][2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Scorecard" (PDF). Coeur d'Alene Resort Golf Course. Retrieved June 26, 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c "Course Rating & Slope: Cd'A Resort". USGA. Retrieved June 26, 2016. 
  3. ^ "June target". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Washington. (photo). March 28, 1973. p. 5. 
  4. ^ Clark, Doug (May 28, 1983). "Templin files suit to stop takeover bid". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. 2. 
  5. ^ Ledford, David (June 5, 1983). "Turf war ends with Hagadone the winner". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. A20. 
  6. ^ a b Rosdahl, Nils (January 12, 2000). "Resort renovation". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. A8. 
  7. ^ Newman, David (May 31, 1984). "Hadadone: Great days ahead for Lake City". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. Aa. 
  8. ^ Kramer, Jeff (May 15, 1985). "North Shore to close for remodeling". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. A8. 
  9. ^ "Resort closes - temporarily". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. January 1, 1986. p. A7. 
  10. ^ Ripley, Richard (May 3, 1986). "Hagadone gambles $60 million that lots of 'sizzle won't fizzle". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. B1. 
  11. ^ Newman, David (May 5, 1986). "20,000 stand in line to tour The Coeur d'Alene resort". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. B6. 
  12. ^ a b Bond, David (September 17, 1987). "Sawmill cleanup studied". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. A6. 
  13. ^ Oliveria, D.F. (May 25, 1988). "Hagadone buying up more land on Lake Coeur d'Alene". Spokane Chronicle. Washington. p. A3. 
  14. ^ Bond, David (January 21, 1987). "Potlatch will close Coeur d'Alene mill". Spokane Chronicle. Washington. p. A3. 
  15. ^ "Historic Rutledge Mill saws its final log". Lewiston Sunday Tribune. Idaho. Associated Press. November 1, 1987. p. 6B. 
  16. ^ Bond, David (October 31, 1987). "Last log sawn at Rutlege mill in wee hours of morning". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. A6. 
  17. ^ "Rutledge mill site sold, Potlatch official says". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. March 3, 1988. p. B2. 
  18. ^ Jones, Grayden (April 12, 1989). "Hagadone swapped land for resort site". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. A6. 
  19. ^ Bender, David (May 25, 1988). "Firefighters will get practice when mill is set ablaze in June". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. A9. 
  20. ^ Goffredo, Theresa (June 8, 1988). "Judge says its OK to burn buildings at Potlatch mill". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. A1. 
  21. ^ a b c "April opening set for golf course". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. staff and wire reports. August 15, 1990. p. B2. 
  22. ^ a b c "Floating green confronts players on Idaho course". Bend Bulletin. Oregon. Associated Press. June 13, 1991. p. E-8. 
  23. ^ a b c "Tee-off pier proposed for floating green". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. September 20, 1991. p. B1. 
  24. ^ Oliveria, D.F.; Bender, David (August 3, 1988). "Skeptics question Hagadone's motives". Spokane Chronicle. Washington. p. C5. 
  25. ^ Oliveria, D.F. (December 10, 1988). "Board gets Hagadone proposals". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. A8. 
  26. ^ Taggart, Cynthia (January 27, 1989). "Region hails 'Northwest playground' plan". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. A1. 
  27. ^ Bergum, Steve (June 3, 2006). "Loop courses maturing nicely". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. 3-golf. 
  28. ^ a b "Floating golf green anchors in Coeur d'Alene". Deseret News. Salt Lake City, Utah. Associated Press. September 2, 1990. p. B9. 
  29. ^ Bond, David (September 24, 1987). "Hearing set on floating green". Spokane Chronicle. Washington. p. A4. 
  30. ^ a b Coeur d'Alene, Official Idaho Vacation and Travel Planning Guide, Accessed January 27, 2009.
  31. ^ "Hagadone: Floating green won't harm lake". Idahonian. Moscow. October 2, 1990. p. 3A. 
  32. ^ "The Best Golf Courses in Idaho". Golf Digest. August 24, 2015. Retrieved July 10, 2016. 

External links[edit]