Brabant Revolution coinage

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A silver 3 Florin coin of the United Belgian States, minted in 1790.

The coinage of the United Belgian States was only produced during the state's one-year existence in 1790, following the Brabant Revolution, but provided a strong numismatic influence for the coinage of Belgium after its independence in 1830.

Background[edit]

In 1789, Brabant Revolution took place in reaction to liberal reforms made by Joseph II and the Austrian rule in Belgium. After Austrian forces were defeated by the rebels at the Battle of Turnhout in 1789, Austrian forces withdrew from the country leaving the rebels in power. On 11 January 1790, with the signing of the Treaty of Union, the counties and dukedoms which had made up the Austrian Netherlands became one country: the United Belgian States.

Coinage[edit]

The coinage was issued in eight denominations[1] divided into Liards, Sols, and Florins. It was only produced during the short one-year lifespan of the country meaning that all examples are dated 1790. Legends are rendered in Latin.

The types minted were:

Denomination Description Legend Metal Photograph
Liard Reverse: Rampant lion holding stylised liberty pole
Obverse: Text
Ad Usus Foederate Belgii
"For Use in the Belgian Federation"
Copper alloy
Double Liard Reverse: Rampant lion holding stylised liberty pole
Obverse: Laureate wreath surrounding text
Ad Usus Foederate Belgii Copper alloy
Ten Sols Reverse: Two disembodied hands shaking above 11 crossed arrows
Obverse: Rampant lion
In Unione Salus
"Salvation in Union"
Silver United States of Belgium - Silver - 10 Sols.jpg
Florin Reverse: Two disembodied hands shaking above 11 crossed arrows
Obverse: Rampant lion
In Unione Salus Silver
Three Florins Reverse: Lion regardant, brandishing sword and a shield labelled Libertas
Obverse: 11 coats of arms around a central son
Domini est Regnum
"Our Kingdom is the Lord's"
Silver Lion d'argent 1790.jpg
14 Florins[2][3] Reverse: Lion regardant, brandishing sword and a shield labelled Libertas
Obverse: 11 coats of arms around a central son
Domini est Regnum Gold

Iconography[edit]

The iconography on the coinage stressed the unity of the state. On the 3 Florin, this was represented by the individual display of all the coats-of-arms of the 11 states which had merged; on the 10 sols, it was represented by 11 arrows behind a two shaking hands.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Republic of Belgium, Lion d'or 1790". Money Museum. Retrieved 20 February 2013.
  2. ^ "Belgium 1790 lion d'or". Coin Wiki. Retrieved 20 February 2013.
  3. ^ "Belgium. Lion d' Or of 14 Florins, 1790 (Brussels)". icollector.com. Retrieved 20 February 2013.
  4. ^ "Belgium: 10 Sols 1790". CACHE' Historical and World Coins. Retrieved 19 February 2013.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]