Communist Party of Canada candidates, 1988 Canadian federal election

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The Communist Party of Canada fielded several candidates in the 1988 federal election, none of whom were elected. Information about these candidates may be found on this page.

Quebec[edit]

Papineau—Saint-Michel: Line Chabot[edit]

Line Chabot was a Communist Party candidate in two federal elections and one provincial election. She described herself as a bookseller in 1984.[1]

Electoral record
Election Division Party Votes  % Place Winner
1984 federal Saint-Michel—Ahuntsic Communist 190 0.47 5/7 Thérèse Killens, Liberal
1985 provincial Dorion Communist 76 0.31 7/11 Violette Trépanier, Liberal
1988 federal Papineau—Saint-Michel Communist 235 0.60 6/9 André Ouellet, Liberal

Ontario[edit]

Geoffrey Da Silva (Eglinton—Lawrence)[edit]

Da Silva received 208 votes (0.52%), finishing fifth against Liberal candidate Joe Volpe. He later became a cabinet minister in Guyana.

Mike Phillips (Sudbury)[edit]

Mike Phillips was a perennial candidate for the Communist Party at the federal and provincial levels. He was a 24-year-old electrician during his first campaign, and later worked as a labour reporter for the Canadian Tribune.[2]

Electoral record
Election Division Party Votes  % Place Winner
1974 federal Davenport Communist 123 4/6 Charles Caccia, Liberal
1975 provincial York South Communist 609 4/4 Donald C. MacDonald, New Democratic Party
1977 provincial York South Communist 526 4/5 Donald C. MacDonald, New Democratic Party
1980 federal York South—Weston Communist 99 5/6 Ursula Appolloni, Liberal
1981 provincial York South Communist 472 4/4 Donald C. MacDonald, New Democratic Party
1984 federal York South—Weston Communist 174 6/6 John Nunziata, Liberal
1988 federal Sudbury Communist 102 0.24 5/5 Diane Marleau, Liberal

John (Jack) C. Sweet (York West)[edit]

Sweet was a toolmaker, administrator and IBM clerk in private life, and was a perennial candidate for federal, provincial and municipal office in North York.[3] He joined the Communist Party at age eighteen and was a member for more than fifty years, working for a time in the organization's Toronto headquarters.[4]

Sweet contributed to "Canadian Aid for Russia" in 1943, during World War II.[5] He was president of Toronto's Tim Buck-Norman Bethune Education Centre during the 1980s.[6] A dedicated community activist, he was also president of the Humberlea Community Association and chairman of a Metro tax reform council.[7] He opposed an expansion of Pearson International Airport in 1989.[8]

He was listed as sixty-six years old during the 1984 campaign.[9]

The closest he ever came to winning election was in 1978, when he was narrowly defeated for a North York school trustee position.

Electoral record
Election Division Party Votes  % Place Winner
1962 North York municipal Council, Ward Seven n/a 450 4/4 John Dean Booth
1964 North York municipal Council, Ward One n/a 650 2/2 John Dean Booth
1966 North York municipal Council, Ward One n/a 210 3/3 John Dean Booth
1969 North York municipal Council, Ward One n/a 405 6/7 Fred Schindeler
1971 provincial Yorkview Communist 391 4/4 Fred Young, New Democratic Party
1972 North York municipal Council, Ward One n/a 180 6/6 Gord Risk
1974 North York municipal Council, Ward One n/a 143 6/6 Gord Risk
1975 provincial Yorkview Communist 594 4/4 Fred Young, New Democratic Party
1976 North York municipal Council, Ward One n/a 385 4/4 Gord Risk
1978 North York municipal School Trustee, Ward One n/a 1,365 2/2 Jo Treasure
1980 North York municipal School Trustee, Ward One n/a 421 4/5 Sheila Lambrinos
1981 provincial Yorkview Communist 503 5/7 Michael Spensieri, Liberal
1982 North York municipal School Trustee, Ward One n/a 717 3/4 Sheila Lambrinos
1984 federal York West Communist 147 7/7 Sergio Marchi, Liberal
12 November 1984 North York municipal by-election Council, Ward One n/a not listed not listed Mario Sergio
1988 federal York West Communist 119 7/7 Sergio Marchi, Liberal

References[edit]

  1. ^ History of Federal Ridings since 1867: SAINT-MICHEL--AHUNTSIC (1984/09/04), Parliament of Canada, accessed 2 September 2011.
  2. ^ Judith Timson, "Inflation worries low-income Davenport", Toronto Star, 18 June 1974, B1; John Munch, "NDP still hurting over '74", Toronto Star, 14 February 1980. See also History of Federal Ridings since 1867: Sudbury (1988/11/21), Parliament of Canada, accessed 5 May 2008.
  3. ^ "Yorkview", Toronto Star, 19 October 1971, 11; Dorothy Lipovenko and Howard Fluxgold, "13 new trustees join Toronto school board", Globe and Mail, 14 November 1978, P5.
  4. ^ Kate Burbridge, "York West hopefuls court huge block of Italian voters", Toronto Star, 21 August 1984, A7; Paul Waldie, "Communists up in arms over party property sale", Globe and Mail, 21 October 1991, A4.
  5. ^ "Canadian aid to Russia nears two million mark", Toronto Star, 13 February 1943, p. 33.
  6. ^ "Communist offices vandalized", Globe and Mail, 18 April 1987, A11.
  7. ^ "Metro area voters to decide 33 ridings", Toronto Star, 18 November 1988, A11.
  8. ^ Gary Webb-Proctor, "Residents oppose additional runways at crowded airport ", Globe and Mail, 28 February 1999, A11.
  9. ^ Mary Gooderham, "In York West, main candidates are Italian", Globe and Mail, 1 September 1984, P19.